Callie Graphics

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How do you "weather" a foam model?

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  • How do you "weather" a foam model?

    I've never tried weathering a model before - and I wouldn't just grab any old chemicals to use on the foamies in fear of eating through them...

    I have this freewing Mustang that is really a ton of fun, and I would like add some weathering to it. I am unsure about what the best method is - preferably for someone who has never done it like myself.

    Any advice is appreciated greatly.

    Andy

  • #2
    Originally posted by PilotAndy1994 View Post
    I've never tried weathering a model before - and I wouldn't just grab any old chemicals to use on the foamies in fear of eating through them... I have this freewing Mustang that is really a ton of fun, and I would like add some weathering to it. I am unsure about what the best method is - preferably for someone who has never done it like myself. Any advice is appreciated greatly. Andy
    PA1994, Welcome to Hobby Squawk. Not certain how far you want to go into weathering, but there are great youtube vids for weathering plastic kits which translate well into foam models. I use Grumbacher Oil Pastels with Mineral Spirits which do not attack the foam at all. I then spray rattle can clear in matte or clear from Tree House Studios available at Hobby Lobby. I have just finished a Flightline 1600mm Spitfire and I chronicled much of that in the Official Thread https://www.hobbysquawk.com/forum/rc-airplanes/propeller-airplanes/58116-official-flightline-rc-1600mm-spitfire-mk-ix-thread/page109 for that kit. If you will look in the Callie Graphics thread in "The Lounge" I posted a PDF of what I did to the airframe before starting the weathering. I am new to weathering, but the results for your aircraft and mine are a matter of personal taste, more or less. https://www.hobbysquawk.com/forum/rc-airplanes/the-hangar/32485-callie-graphics-picture-gallery/page16 if I can assist or you have any questions, just ask in your thread. I am sure you will get great advice here. Best, LB
    Captain: Got any ideas?
    F/O: Actually not.
    — Captain Chesley B 'Sully' Sullenberger III and F/O Jeff Skiles—

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Elbee View Post

      PA1994, Welcome to Hobby Squawk. Not certain how far you want to go into weathering, but there are great youtube vids for weathering plastic kits which translate well into foam models. I use Grumbacher Oil Pastels with Mineral Spirits which do not attack the foam at all. I then spray rattle can clear in matte or clear from Tree House Studios available at Hobby Lobby. I have just finished a Flightline 1600mm Spitfire and I chronicled much of that in the Official Thread https://www.hobbysquawk.com/forum/rc-airplanes/propeller-airplanes/58116-official-flightline-rc-1600mm-spitfire-mk-ix-thread/page109 for that kit. If you will look in the Callie Graphics thread in "The Lounge" I posted a PDF of what I did to the airframe before starting the weathering. I am new to weathering, but the results for your aircraft and mine are a matter of personal taste, more or less. https://www.hobbysquawk.com/forum/rc-airplanes/the-hangar/32485-callie-graphics-picture-gallery/page16 if I can assist or you have any questions, just ask in your thread. I am sure you will get great advice here. Best, LB
      Thank you Kindly, Elbee! I can't wait to get started with this mustang! I really like your Spit - awesome! the paint on this Freeweing model seems to be pretty good, so I dont expect it to peel or chip. I'd love to make some exhaust trails - but don't know which kind of chemical to use - black paint? thinned? I will definitely check out some videos and hopefully be able to dirty this girl up. I"ll post pics if it's pic-worthy.

      Thanks a lot!

      Andy

      Comment


      • #4
        Andy, I presume you have an airbrush as that is the easiest way to do exhaust and smoke trails. I used Model Masters "Burnt Metal" with just a bit of "Flat Black" to darken it. The burnt metal color is very thin to start so keep your mix to that consistency using lower air pressure. I airbrushed about 3-4 passes on each fuselage side very very lightly moving from aft to the exhaust stack. I think less is more here as most modelers seem to overdo this. Same with the cannon or gun smoke on the wings. The beauty of having laid down a couple coats of the Minwax Gloss Clear is you can use mineral spirits to wipe away most mistakes and begin again. Post pics for sure. Best, LB

        PS: Andy, You can also use a very soft graphite artist pencil available at Hobby Lobby to highlight your panel lines and smudge it a bit to get it to look dirty. This is very easy and can be easily controlled. The same applies to any soft colored artist pencils and aforementioned Grumbacher Oil Pastels. Again mineral spirits can be used to soften colors with either of these techniques.
        Last edited by Elbee; Dec 7th, 2018, 11:44 AM. Reason: Added the post-script.
        Captain: Got any ideas?
        F/O: Actually not.
        — Captain Chesley B 'Sully' Sullenberger III and F/O Jeff Skiles—

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Elbee View Post
          Andy, I presume you have an airbrush as that is the easiest way to do exhaust and smoke trails. I used Model Masters "Burnt Metal" with just a bit of "Flat Black" to darken it. The burnt metal color is very thin to start so keep your mix to that consistency using lower air pressure. I airbrushed about 3-4 passes on each fuselage side very very lightly moving from aft to the exhaust stack. I think less is more here as most modelers seem to overdo this. Same with the cannon or gun smoke on the wings. The beauty of having laid down a couple coats of the Minwax Gloss Clear is you can use mineral spirits to wipe away most mistakes and begin again. Post pics for sure. Best, LB

          PS: Andy, You can also use a very soft graphite artist pencil available at Hobby Lobby to highlight your panel lines and smudge it a bit to get it to look dirty. This is very easy and can be easily controlled. The same applies to any soft colored artist pencils and aforementioned Grumbacher Oil Pastels. Again mineral spirits can be used to soften colors with either of these techniques.
          This is great because I have a lot of art supplies like graphite pencils laying around from art kits. That sounds like it would look great. Unfortunately I don't have an air brush, but the pencils are right up my alley. Thanks!

          Comment


          • #6
            Got home from school a few hours ago and spent a few minutes with a Charcoal crayon trying my hand at making some weathering marks. They look better in person - from really far away....The exhaust stains are getting better with more layers - and adding directional flow.

            I could see where a liquid application would be easier. The crayon is very soft - and I am using my fingers to work it onto the surface.

            I think it really ages the surface when compared to the original wing.

            It will be a progressive process! I enjoy it, too.
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #7
              A94, you've just jumped down the rabbit hole. Lookin' Good, Mate. Best, :B
              Captain: Got any ideas?
              F/O: Actually not.
              — Captain Chesley B 'Sully' Sullenberger III and F/O Jeff Skiles—

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Elbee View Post
                A94, you've just jumped down the rabbit hole. Lookin' Good, Mate. Best, :B
                Here's some better shots today after I did the other side. Looks more like the pre-cursor to full weathering - which I am happy with, considering it's a new - to - me plane. Maybe if it makes it a few years I can go all out and really get it detailed. I am content with him now.

                You've noticed my picture by now - maybe - of our beloved girl, Boo Boo - an English Bulldog. I made a sticker with some neat paper I found and printed out some tail art.....Cute. Had to be careful not to get any smudges on those...Was a fun little process. Will try other materials and processes in the future.

                Thanks,

                Andy
                Attached Files

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm not entirely pleased with how the exhaust looks - but I believe that to be due to the foam pattern underneath getting more contrast. It doesn't look as natural with those beads showing up so clearly. Maybe after a few more "start ups"....

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by PilotAndy1994 View Post
                    I'm not entirely pleased with how the exhaust looks - but I believe that to be due to the foam pattern underneath getting more contrast. It doesn't look as natural with those beads showing up so clearly. Maybe after a few more "start ups"....
                    PA, It looks great. And at 70mph, 6 ft off the ground and 30 ft away it will be outstanding! Lots of planes yet to be weathered. Best, LB
                    Captain: Got any ideas?
                    F/O: Actually not.
                    — Captain Chesley B 'Sully' Sullenberger III and F/O Jeff Skiles—

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Would I need to minwax first before panel lines with the pencil dust or panel line paint or minwax after?
                      Still Learning:D

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Pauly View Post
                        Would I need to minwax first before panel lines with the pencil dust or panel line paint or minwax after?
                        Pauly, I put down 2 coats of Minwax gloss to seal my paint coats and give a base for decals and the weathering. The payoff for me was if I didn't like a certain weathering effect or I messed up, I could use mineral spirits to wipe it away and start again. I finished the model with matte finish rattle can from Hobby Lobby to protect everything. This step really pulls everything together I think, as decals, paints, and pastels all have varying degrees of gloss. Best, LB

                        Captain: Got any ideas?
                        F/O: Actually not.
                        — Captain Chesley B 'Sully' Sullenberger III and F/O Jeff Skiles—

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Weathering is holding up on her....Flew a bit in the snow yesterday in a slushy parking lot - lots of water spraying around...

                          Went ahead and did the same job to my little fella

                          It's not a excellent show job - but it's quick, cheap, and makes a point....No fuss

                          Looks pretty awesome in a fly-by as well.....

                          Andy
                          Attached Files

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