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Servo testing and centering.

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  • Servo testing and centering.

    Many of the RTF models these days come not only with the servos installed, but also with the push rod connected to the control surface and the servo. You may find this little tip will save you a servo or control surface. Before connecting the servo to the RX and power. Disconnect the push rod and center the servo first. If the push rods have not been fitted correctly at the factory during assembly, it can stall the servo when it is first connected to your radio and turned on. If you don't realize what has happened, it will burn out the servo motor. After you have centered the servo, them connect the pushrod and check the controls.

    Its a good idea to invest in a servo tester, they are not expensive and you can cycle the servos, test them and center them without connecting to the radio. With all the flying surfaces connected, I cycle all the servos for 5 minutes. This will make sure they all work and any problems will show up on the ground and not in flight.

  • #2
    RE: Servo testing and centering.

    Originally posted by Martin.MotionRC
    Many of the RTF models these days come not only with the servos installed, but also with the push rod connected to the control surface and the servo. You may find this little tip will save you a servo or control surface. Before connecting the servo to the RX and power. Disconnect the push rod and center the servo first. If the push rods have not been fitted correctly at the factory during assembly, it can stall the servo when it is first connected to your radio and turned on. If you don't realize what has happened, it will burn out the servo motor. After you have centered the servo, them connect the pushrod and check the controls.

    Its a good idea to invest in a servo tester, they are not expensive and you can cycle the servos, test them and center them without connecting to the radio. With all the flying surfaces connected, I cycle all the servos for 5 minutes. This will make sure they all work and any problems will show up on the ground and not in flight.
    One thing about servo testers: they usually test the range from 1000 to 2000 uS, which is the range of a standard servo, and set the center to 1500 uS. However, many radio systems actually use about 1120 to 1940 uS (at 100%), and center is about 1520 uS. So, if you use a tester to set the zero point, don't be surprised if it isn't the same when you connect the receiver to the servos, unless your tester can be adjusted to the actual center of your radio.

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    • #3
      RE: Servo testing and centering.

      Hey Martin and welcome to the community !

      When you get a chance will you check to see when the servo tester might be back in , they have been out some time . I do know that Tom or Mark have remarked they were waiting on them but its been a long time .

      Thanks Bryan
      But Crashing is Landing

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      • #4
        RE: Servo testing and centering.

        Greetings,

        Servo testers are the absolute best bang for your RC buck!!!
        Well, at least one of them.

        Thanks Martin.... good common sense info!!


        Clear Skies

        Bill L.
        In Okla.

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        • #5
          RE: Servo testing and centering.

          Originally posted by WintrSol
          Originally posted by Martin.MotionRC
          Many of the RTF models these days come not only with the servos installed, but also with the push rod connected to the control surface and the servo. You may find this little tip will save you a servo or control surface. Before connecting the servo to the RX and power. Disconnect the push rod and center the servo first. If the push rods have not been fitted correctly at the factory during assembly, it can stall the servo when it is first connected to your radio and turned on. If you don't realize what has happened, it will burn out the servo motor. After you have centered the servo, them connect the pushrod and check the controls.

          Its a good idea to invest in a servo tester, they are not expensive and you can cycle the servos, test them and center them without connecting to the radio. With all the flying surfaces connected, I cycle all the servos for 5 minutes. This will make sure they all work and any problems will show up on the ground and not in flight.
          One thing about servo testers: they usually test the range from 1000 to 2000 uS, which is the range of a standard servo, and set the center to 1500 uS. However, many radio systems actually use about 1120 to 1940 uS (at 100%), and center is about 1520 uS. So, if you use a tester to set the zero point, don't be surprised if it isn't the same when you connect the receiver to the servos, unless your tester can be adjusted to the actual center of your radio.
          *You are so right, WintrSol. It's not that difficult to center your servos with the radio, just to be sure. Doc

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi all. Just received my servo tester(G.T.Power). Soldered the connectors to a 6v battery box and plugged the cyclic servos (Savox 262) in. centred them and then plugged them back into the AR7200BX.
            Went thru the setup and non of the servos were near the center the FBL center. Tried the tail(Savox 265) and same thing. Am I doing something wrong?

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