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receiver glue?

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  • #21
    a little update with testing the fix n flex. I glued a single side of a old car size servo to a hunk of styrofoam. it doesn't budge. takes about 2 days to fully set up though. other than the drying time, this is the real deal. it works very well. I did order foam tac from amazon to test. since it comes highly recommended.
    I notice horizon hobby is stocking the fix n flex stuff. that explains why my local hobby store had it.

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    • #22
      foam tac is going into trash can. it melts some kinds of foam. I will not be using it on anything. fix n flex doesn't harm this foam at all or on my plane wing. foam tac melted right through this foam in just minutes.
      Attached Files

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      • #23
        Are you going to fly this foam, or are you looking to disprove the foam-tac? thread # 2 you state this.
        AMA 424553

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        • #24
          well you all promote it like it's the bee's knees. and low and behold it will attack some foams. just tell people the truth. the other stuff doesn't harm any kind of foam at all

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          • #25
            Originally posted by serpentracer View Post
            foam tac is going into trash can. it melts some kinds of foam. I will not be using it on anything. fix n flex doesn't harm this foam at all or on my plane wing. foam tac melted right through this foam in just minutes.
            That looks like the type of foam used for making packing boxes, but more like house insulation sheets (I have a large sheet of it in the garage). I don't think they make model planes out of that stuff. So yeah, if you're going to make model airplane out of insulation foam, then sure, don't use FoamTac. Personally, I'll stick with FTac for planes - EPS, EPO, EPP (and use as directed). I've not seen FTac do that to any of my planes and I've been using it for years (and that's the truth).
            House insulation sheets (and shipping boxes) are made of EPS but is formed and pressed in a different way specifically for thermal conduction in mind (R value). EPS for model airplanes gets pressed and treated in a different way. House insulation is also made of Extruded Polystyrene and Polyisocyanurate. I don't believe model planes are made of any of these and not using the same process. However, if you don't like it from your "test", then don't use it.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by serpentracer View Post
              well you all promote it like it's the bee's knees. and low and behold it will attack some foams. just tell people the truth. the other stuff doesn't harm any kind of foam at all
              I don't believe that I've seen anyone not tell the truth here.
              We get it ……you like your new found product.
              As a matter of fact, I clearly provided enlightening info for you about Foam Tac's usage over on the "Best Glue" thread that you have been cross posting to.
              Speaking of that, as a forum moderator I need to advise you that cross posting is against the forums Code of Conduct and is considered SPAM so please refrain from doing so.
              Warbird Charlie
              HSD Skyraider; FlightLine: Sea Fury; FMS 1400: P-40B, P-51, F4U, F6F, T-28, P-40E, 1700 F4U & F7F and a Fox glider; Freewing: A-6, P-51; VQ: P-39; Dynam: ME-262, FW-190, Waco; ASM A-26; ESM F7F-3; LX PBJ-1 EFL CZ T-28, C-150

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              • #27
                WARNING! Do not ruffle Warbirds feathers.

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                • #28


                  Sorry, I just couldn't stop myself.
                  Best regards,
                  Cris B.
                  AMA#L945841, NASA#2845, JPO#2503,
                  NSRCA#4603, IMAC#7357

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                  • #29
                    so my final verdict would be as follows

                    fix n flex
                    pros:
                    works on all foams that I've tested it with.
                    strong bond to plastic and foam
                    very flexible
                    removable from plastic.
                    clear
                    little to no odor
                    stays put on vertical surfaces

                    cons:
                    takes about 24 to 36 hrs to cure


                    Foam Tac
                    pros
                    dries quickly
                    sticks great to plastics and foam
                    clear.

                    cons:
                    runs off vertical surfaces easy (minimized by quick skinning over due to evaporation of solvents)
                    highly flammable
                    strong odor
                    is impossible to remove from plastics without mechanical means. (knife)
                    will attack some foams. (be sure to test first)
                    cap will glue itself to bottle if you don't clean it off very well.


                    I think each one of these is a great glue. if you want something fixed faster Foam Tac would be the better choice. however if you dont mind waiting 12 hrs longer for it to set up the Fix N Flex is in my opinion the better choice. just because you can clean it off servos or receivers with your fingers. it's not going to fall off but you wont need a knife or something to scrape it off. it is a lot more flexible than foam tac. it is slightly stiffer than typical silicone

                    at the end of the day, they both work as intended. but beware Foam Tac will attack some foams. and could attack electronics housings or the electronics themselves due to the solvents in it.


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