2000mm Giant Scale B-24 - Olive Drab

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Teaching Myself to Fly

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  • Teaching Myself to Fly

    I've been thinking about RC flying for 8 years.

    I've been to fields and each one has it's unique personality.

    Rather than going through the pain and ridicule that comes with learning under the spotlight of turbine and 3D pilots, I think I might try to teach myself.

    I've seen threads on it on forums and others have done it.

    If I do this what plane should I start with?

    How about the Ezio 800mm glider?

    https://hobbyking.com/en_us/hking-ez...r-800-pnp.html

    It's cheap enough but shipping is a bit higher than I'd like.

  • #2
    There are a number of great trainers on Motions website. But, probably one of the best things to do for starters is to get a RC flight simulator such as Real Flight.


    Also, take a read through this thread:
    https://www.hobbysquawk.com/forum/rc...ner-foam-plane

    Lot's of great suggestions in there.
    Last edited by Prowler901; Feb 18th, 2018, 12:08 PM. Reason: Added link.

    Comment


    • #3
      I learned to fly by myself there are no clubs or fields in my area. Every one has their own “best first airplane” my first was an old HobbyZone Super Cub RTF. I recommend the newer version HobbyZone SuperCub S in bind and fly and get a 6+ channel transmitter. The 6 channel transmitter will give you more options in the future. Hope this helps and Welcome to the Squawk and happy flying.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have the Phoenix flight simulator and DX5e; albeit old.

        Comment


        • #5
          That is a great way to learn . I too am self taught and I learned the hard way . Spend as much time as you can on the Sim but don't burn out . Run it like you were really flying . Set a timer for 5 mins. and when its time come in and land . Step back because this is what you will do at a field . The Sim will help teach you muscle control and things will become automatic instead of " Oh Crap " .

          Always ask any question you have everyone here will give all we can to help . No one was born knowing how to fly we all had to learn .


          Bryan
          But Crashing is Landing

          Comment


          • #6
            The Ezio flies a little faster than I'd like but it is advertised as something suitable for a beginner. It's bigger than a Radian UMX, which will hopefully add a little more stability.

            Comment


            • #7
              Unless I learn something different, I am going to get the DX6 $199 and the Radian UMX on sale now $79. At least I will be moving forward.

              Comment


              • #8
                Sounds like a plan good luck and enjoy!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I purchased the DX6 and UMX Radian tonight.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    G'day BBQ,
                    After reading the rubbish that you have been put through, I think you have made the right choice with both the model and teaching yourself. I think the Radian to forgiving enough to get you through.
                    If I may give you a tip. Before the first flight do a lot of chuck testing. Just throw the model out gently at shoulder height, all loaded of course, and watch its initial movements for roll and stall. Make your adjustments then and when you have her all trimmed out go for a full launch.
                    My experience with Radians is that they climb like home sick Angels so be ready to tame the elevator after launch. It is not a trim problem but they do climb under power.
                    I wish I still had mine but she went to model heaven after a radio malfunction.
                    Regards and respect
                    Daryl

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have to learn what it means to "trim" a model. I see it referenced a lot, but I need to read more to better understand the meaning.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by thebbqguy View Post
                        I have to learn what it means to "trim" a model. I see it referenced a lot, but I need to read more to better understand the meaning.
                        Trim = adjusting so if the airplane is at appx 60% to 75% throttle and flying level it can be allowed to fly with no corrections for at least 30 seconds without significantly changing attitude or flight path.

                        Make the plane capable of going "hands off"

                        Note that gyro stabilizers can make an out of trim airplane track pretty well without needing manual correction.

                        BEST is to get the aircraft trimmed for hands off capability without the gyro/autopilot, then the gyro does not have to work as hard.

                        I will adjust the transmitter trims to make the plane fly hands off. When I get home I note the control surface positions, then center the transmitter trims and adjust the linkage between servo and control surface to put the surface back where it had been due to the trim setting. Mechanically trimming the plane is better than electronically trimming.
                        FF gliders and rubber power since 1966, CL 1970-1990, RC since 1975.

                        current planes from 1/2 oz to 22 lbs

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hello everyone,

                          I've been following the discussions on this tread for some time and now feel confident enough to add my 2 cents worth. I'm basically a self taught beginner pilot. When I decided to indulge into this hobby, I went in, eyes wide opened. My first two planes was the Dynam Corsair and FMS P-51B. After two years to date, neither has had it's maiden yet, for I too, am a slow cautious flyer. I purchased the FMS Easy Trainer, to begin my actual flying experience once I tore myself away from the sim. My major transition was being able to distinguish distance and depth, landing follows close behind, as making mistakes on the sim was much more forgiving. I ALMOST hate that I'm babying my Corsair and P-51B and treating the Easy Trainer, as a bald-headed step child. She has been up numerous times and came down hard numerous times. She's been under repair so many times, I'm thinking of nicknaming her:
                          Evel Knievel(for those of you who knows).

                          For now, she'll take all the bumps and bruises, until the time's right. Even though, I do consider myself a self learner, that's not entirely true. I have a great many instructors helping me here on this forum as well as those we may encounter at the field. With that being said, thanks to everyone who spend the time to educate those of us, who benefits from your experience and helpfulness.
                          As long as you keep giving, I'll keep coming back for more ...
                          Straighten Up - Fly Right

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            There is no perfect trainer that suits everyone's needs.

                            My main reason to not recommend UMX (anything) for a beginner is they are small, light and get bounced around by light wind gusts. You'll be flying low because you need to keep them closer to be able to see which way they are pointed so you are more likely to be in the ground turbulence.
                            Around here, small and light doesn't fly much. The wind is often too strong for the micro P-51 to make forward progress over the ground when going into the wind. The UMX Radian is slower.

                            Different prevailing winds can make that UMX Radian into an excellent choice as a first airplane.

                            I have given beginners lessons on just about anything other than an EDF model. That included (when I had it) my GP 60 inch Fokker Dr1. You can tweak almost anything to be OK as a trainer as long as its not overweight. A trainer does need to fly slowly enough to give the student time to react.

                            For example, the Dynam P-51, add the flaps (they are pre-hinged, easy to do it) and put them down appx 10 degrees. Push the CG forward, shim the LG so the wheels are further forward when down and you can get the CG a little further forward. It becomes very stable.
                            Note that the Dynam P-51 has a reputation for out of balance spinner and that can rattle the motor off the mount. My Dynam P-51 now has a Dynam 4 blade prop. (I have to pull the spinner to see which for sure, looks better than the original 3 blade.) and DuBro spinner cut for the extra blades. Its a heavier spinner so the CG goes forward just by making this change.
                            FF gliders and rubber power since 1966, CL 1970-1990, RC since 1975.

                            current planes from 1/2 oz to 22 lbs

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by fhhuber View Post
                              There is no perfect trainer that suits everyone's needs.

                              My main reason to not recommend UMX (anything) for a beginner is they are small, light and get bounced around by light wind gusts. You'll be flying low because you need to keep them closer to be able to see which way they are pointed so you are more likely to be in the ground turbulence.
                              Around here, small and light doesn't fly much. The wind is often too strong for the micro P-51 to make forward progress over the ground when going into the wind. The UMX Radian is slower.

                              Different prevailing winds can make that UMX Radian into an excellent choice as a first airplane.

                              I have given beginners lessons on just about anything other than an EDF model. That included (when I had it) my GP 60 inch Fokker Dr1. You can tweak almost anything to be OK as a trainer as long as its not overweight. A trainer does need to fly slowly enough to give the student time to react.

                              For example, the Dynam P-51, add the flaps (they are pre-hinged, easy to do it) and put them down appx 10 degrees. Push the CG forward, shim the LG so the wheels are further forward when down and you can get the CG a little further forward. It becomes very stable.
                              Note that the Dynam P-51 has a reputation for out of balance spinner and that can rattle the motor off the mount. My Dynam P-51 now has a Dynam 4 blade prop. (I have to pull the spinner to see which for sure, looks better than the original 3 blade.) and DuBro spinner cut for the extra blades. Its a heavier spinner so the CG goes forward just by making this change.
                              I have a Dynam P-51 and it has the out of balance spinner problem so I would be very curious which 4 blade prop you are using.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                DYP-1026S 10.5*8*4 (4 blades standard rotation)
                                I found the package tag.

                                I flew it for a while on APC 11*9 4 blade. That's too heavy load on the OEM motor and ESC.
                                I did upgrade the motor to the one from the Dynam Me-109 so I could spin it higher rpm using 4S.

                                The Dynam prop looks better on the model. It would work with the OEM ESC and motor on 3S. (not 4S)

                                The OEM prop on the P-51 can be used with 4S without changing motor or ESC.
                                FF gliders and rubber power since 1966, CL 1970-1990, RC since 1975.

                                current planes from 1/2 oz to 22 lbs

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by fhhuber View Post
                                  DYP-1026S 10.5*8*4 (4 blades standard rotation)
                                  I found the package tag.

                                  I flew it for a while on APC 11*9 4 blade. That's too heavy load on the OEM motor and ESC.
                                  I did upgrade the motor to the one from the Dynam Me-109 so I could spin it higher rpm using 4S.

                                  The Dynam prop looks better on the model. It would work with the OEM ESC and motor on 3S. (not 4S)

                                  The OEM prop on the P-51 can be used with 4S without changing motor or ESC.
                                  Thanks for the info.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by mcriley2 View Post
                                    Hello everyone,

                                    I've been following the discussions on this tread for some time and now feel confident enough to add my 2 cents worth. I'm basically a self taught beginner pilot. When I decided to indulge into this hobby, I went in, eyes wide opened. My first two planes was the Dynam Corsair and FMS P-51B. After two years to date, neither has had it's maiden yet, for I too, am a slow cautious flyer. I purchased the FMS Easy Trainer, to begin my actual flying experience once I tore myself away from the sim. My major transition was being able to distinguish distance and depth, landing follows close behind, as making mistakes on the sim was much more forgiving. I ALMOST hate that I'm babying my Corsair and P-51B and treating the Easy Trainer, as a bald-headed step child. She has been up numerous times and came down hard numerous times. She's been under repair so many times, I'm thinking of nicknaming her:
                                    Evel Knievel(for those of you who knows).

                                    For now, she'll take all the bumps and bruises, until the time's right. Even though, I do consider myself a self learner, that's not entirely true. I have a great many instructors helping me here on this forum as well as those we may encounter at the field. With that being said, thanks to everyone who spend the time to educate those of us, who benefits from your experience and helpfulness.
                                    As long as you keep giving, I'll keep coming back for more ...
                                    Having signed up to Hobby Squawk three years ago but only posted twice, I'd say "Welcome to Hobby Squawk" but you've been a family member for a while now!

                                    You're flying a capable trainer from FMS, keep at it and don't lose hope. You'll do just fine, I'm sure! I recommend making a flight plan and sticking to it, flying the same routine over and over again. Consistency is key. Gradually add new maneuvers as you master familiar ones.

                                    I'm the guy who literally points at the sky before I take off and talks to myself, narrating everything I'm going to do once I take off all the way to landing. "Power up here, rudder right here, manage the tail, tail up here, release rudder here, beware pitch over here, throttle gradual not sudden, liftoff here, shallow climb, gear up here, 80% power by here, turn here, wings level here..." I talk myself through that process for maidening prototypes here at the factory, which is important since they're most often the only one in the world at that time and a crash would be costly in time and money. The same principle applies for teaching yourself how to fly and working up the ladder. Preparation and Consistency.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      There are many good simulators on Ebay. Let me see if I can find the one I purchased a while back. It cost me around 30 bucks or so.

                                      There is no pain and ridicule, not sure if its you who is putting a wall or if ALL the clubs are as you say, which I think its just a matter of accepting the noob status. Most fields have a trainer for new members, which brings to paying a fee and having your AMA license. As long as you have those and follow the guidelines nobody can say anything. There should be specific dates and/or designated instructors for esch club. Visit their websites and go through the policies section.

                                      I have been following your postings and to me the learning barrier is been put by yourself. You posted a while back that you dont like such and such airplane because it uses rubber bands. Of course buddy, you are a noob, so? No big deal. This is similar to the person who is frantic on walking into a gym because its intimidated by all the muscle testosterone hitting the weights.

                                      If been a noob in the field with a "horrific" rubber band plane, much worst is been a senior pilot and crashing when teaching someone else to fly. A friend of mine went through that, and it was very very humbling for him, did not see him for a while at the club.

                                      People have posted many recommended airplanes and you still deviate and go for something else. Looks like you are not listening to others and stuck into your "should be logical" decisions.

                                      I am sorry, but the main barrier to overcome is your ego.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I'm sure my ego is heavily involved. .

                                        I've been flying on the Phoenix simulator for quite a while.

                                        I decided I want to fly Sailplanes but that club field is closed until May due to the road situation.

                                        So I'm starting down the path. I decided to take action and that's what I'm doing.

                                        I will still go the club route but I'm not going to wait till May to do something. LoL.

                                        I have appreciated and actually spent a lot of time looking at each suggested plane.

                                        I can fly the little Radian in my back yard. If I break it out of the gate, it was a $79 learning experience.

                                        Then I will have a good story to tell about my stubbornness.

                                        Comment

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