Callie Graphics

You must Sign-in or Register to post messages in the Hobby Squawk community
Registration is FREE and only takes a few moments

Register now

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How windy is too windy?

Collapse
X
Collapse
First Prev Next Last
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How windy is too windy?

    FMS T-28 GOSHAWK and FMS B-25 Mitchell.
    I flew a T-28 a few months back in 15mph winds, but today they ate 17mph with gusts to 25mph.
    I think that is a bit too much.

  • #2
    Originally posted by chipset35 View Post
    FMS T-28 GOSHAWK and FMS B-25 Mitchell.
    I flew a T-28 a few months back in 15mph winds, but today they ate 17mph with gusts to 25mph.
    I think that is a bit too much.
    Wind rates are really relative to your skill set and your plane price nerve level
    I've flown a Tech One P-40 ( 1000mm span) in 30mph plus and had a blast but I won't put my bigger warbirds up past 20mph.
    It just becomes to much of fight when it comes landing preparations.
    Warbird Charlie
    HSD Skyraider; FlightLine: Sea Fury; FMS 1400: P-40B, P-51, F4U, F6F, T-28, P-40E, 1700 F4U and a Fox glider; Freewing: A-6, P-51; VQ: P-39; Dynam: ME-262, FW-190, Waco; ASM A-26; ESM F7F-3
    Incinerator Loss 16

    Comment


    • #3
      I cranked up the wind to 25mph in the Real Flight 8 Simulator and loved it!
      Not sure how realistic it is...but I flew the B-25 Mitchell they have in it.
      I seem to fly better in the wind, but like I said not sure how realistic.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yeah its gonna be alittle different because you will find thermal up lifts and down drafts that the software just cant duplicate accurately. But that said it is nice to have it for extra practice.

        Comment


        • #5
          I've flown a few times in hard, steady wind and I just hang the plane up there just like seagulls hang in an airstream. The biggest demons out there are "Gusts"! I remember flying an EFlite Taylorcraft that was turned into "balsa kindling" after a huge gust grabbed it and smashed it. I fought with the wind, but Nature won. Gusts are not fun....You never know when they'll strike. When I was learning, I spent time watching birds in heavy weather....

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by OV10 View Post

            Wind rates are really relative to your skill set and your plane price nerve level
            Agreed! For this question to be answered correctly and truthfully, it must be asked of someone with the same skill level and the same regard to what's been invested. When I first started, I wouldn't fly if too many birds farted at the same time. Now, if I really wanted to fly on a particular day, I'd take out my windy day planes and "see what it'll do". And here again, my idea of a windy day is not the same as someone else's.

            Comment


            • #7
              See Ed's msg -same sumject

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm one of the weirdos that actually prefers windsurfing from time to time, especially with a model that isn't intended for choppy winds. Some of the larger EDFs can be fun in wind (roaring fast downwind and parked standstill upwind), such as the Freewing 90mm Venom and 80mm Mirage, and the old Starmax 90mm MiG-15. Some models don't like it at all, such as my Freewing F-14 and Starmax T-33. It just depends on the model, the type of wind, and your appetite for risk on that day. I'd say newer models wait for calmer conditions on average. But once a model has many flights and/or some damage on it, I'll fly it in almost any condition. It can make for a good learning experience.

                Probably the most fun I've had in strong but consistent wind was helicopter landing a Parkzone T-28. A couple of us took turns trying to land it in a five foot circle. I swear at times that bird was flying backwards!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Spanaway View Post
                  See Ed's msg -same sumject
                  Did you really mean to send me a private "visitor message"? I think everyone could have enjoyed your message to me.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Definitely depends on the model, and how turbulent conditions are. I just got back from Flite Fest Texas, and on Saturday it was 30mph winds. Flew my AH-6 Little Bird heli 3 times, and my Navy Cub. The heli just cuts through the wind and isn't really bothered. The Cub is a tremendous fun in wind. Was able to hover over the center of the runway, and go backwards. Other planes like my 90mm F-4 are definitely more sensitive to gusts. Flying at the Texas Electic Expo in 25mph, the Phantom flew fantastic. However, I caught a gust just as I flared. The model shot up about 15 ft, and was then left with hardly any airspeed. Need to replace my nosewheel pin now.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hurricane force winds.. . Yes i have done it, twice, in Sandy and Harvey.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by OV10 View Post

                        Wind rates are really relative to your skill set and your plane price nerve level
                        That's pretty much where I am on it. I see pilots here and on Youtube that will fly in winds that I would not feel comfortable flying in, and they seem to do just fine. I suspect as my skills develop and I become a more experienced pilot, I'll also become more comfortable with conditions that are less than ideal.

                        In Scuba Diving, it's often said that a diver should never be afraid to call a dive due to either personal conditions, or environmental conditions. It's better to miss a dive because you're not feeling your best, or the site looks problematic, than to risk an accident. While we don't tend to face the same risk level with our planes as we do diving, it's up to each individual pilot whether they're willing to risk crashing a plane due to poor conditions, or whether they'd rather just skip flying that day. A good club will never shame you for deciding to scrub the mission, so to speak.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I don't care for flying in wind, so my limits are very low. UMX Timber/J3 have wind cut off of 5mph. Mostly because I fly them in a very small area, over the water, and near homes. Lots of factors going into each flight and wind adds another one. Plus, the planes look horrible bouncing around in the air. UMX P-51 and P-47 have a cut off around 10mph, especially the Mustang that does well in the wind. I fly these in a larger area with fewer concerns. On calm nights, I do fly the P-51 and P-47 in my back yard over the water. Larger planes have a cut off of 12 mph constant and 15 mph gusts. I don't feel comfortable flying any planes in winds over 15 mph. I hate how they fly, hate how they look, hate fighting the plane, and hate the risk. I catch a lot of crap online and from pilots at the field when I don't fly above my comfort zone. Well, it is my plane, my time, and my investment. Pick on me all you want, but if I am not comfortable, I don't fly. I always go with the saying "there are bold pilots and old pilots, but no old bold pilots". While a crash with an RC isn't fatal, the wife could kill me when I get home with a crashed plane.

                          The bad thing about my low wind tolerance is that I don't fly very often. The good thing is that most of my flights are at dusk when it calms down, and that is also when most people head home from the field. Nothing beats a relaxing dusk flight with clear airspace.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Usually 12-15 mph is my limit for electric mostly because you burn through mAh quickly so not really worth it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I've flown in somewhat extreme winds. We never packed up from the slope soaring ridge due to high wind, we just added lead to the aircraft.

                              If you are willing to stand in it to d the flight, there is a model that can fly in it.
                              FF gliders and rubber power since 1966, CL 1970-1990, RC since 1975.

                              current planes from 1/2 oz to 22 lbs

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X