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  • Originally posted by Valkpilot View Post

    The reason I cited FPV quads it due to the altitudes involved in these incidents. The people are either FPV or have DAMN GOOD eyesight. And yes, any of our aircraft could become a "cruise missile". I remember reading about a wannabe Jihadi who bought and built several large EDFs, and planned to load them with explosives and fly them into the Senate Office Building. After doing this, his "ground team" would be waiting in the street and start sniping people coming out of the building. Fortunately, the people he contacted for the "ground crew" was a FBI sting team.
    The unofficial (because they ruled an engine mod to be illegal.... he built his own supercharger) altitude record for RC in 1977, by Maynard Hill was appx 37.000 ft with a fixed wing model, no FPV, no gyro or other autopilot...
    It was a cover story for Model Aviation.
    He coordinated with US Navy (to borrow telescopic turret mounted binoculars) FAA, FAI and AMA for the attempt.

    It has been common for RC sailplanes winch launched or High Start launched (launches get them to about 500 to 700 ft) to exceed 3000 ft AGL which is about the limit of unaided (no binoculars or telescope) for over 40 years.

    Some of the initial YouTube videos that caught FAA attention about reckless RC flying were fixed wing models exceeding 7000 ft AGL with a solid cloud layer from 3500 to 5000 ft.

    Quads are definitively not the only things flying high.

    *****************

    BTW... for possibly over 30 years... Maynard Hill owned just about every RC endurance, altitude, distance from takeoff to touchdown and other "feat" records in model aviation
    FF gliders and rubber power since 1966, CL 1970-1990, RC since 1975.

    current planes from 1/2 oz to 22 lbs

    Comment


    • Originally posted by fhhuber View Post

      The unofficial (because they ruled an engine mod to be illegal.... he built his own supercharger) altitude record for RC in 1977, by Maynard Hill was appx 37.000 ft with a fixed wing model, no FPV, no gyro or other autopilot...
      It was a cover story for Model Aviation.
      He coordinated with US Navy (to borrow telescopic turret mounted binoculars) FAA, FAI and AMA for the attempt.

      It has been common for RC sailplanes winch launched or High Start launched (launches get them to about 500 to 700 ft) to exceed 3000 ft AGL which is about the limit of unaided (no binoculars or telescope) for over 40 years.

      Some of the initial YouTube videos that caught FAA attention about reckless RC flying were fixed wing models exceeding 7000 ft AGL with a solid cloud layer from 3500 to 5000 ft.

      Quads are definitively not the only things flying high.

      *****************

      BTW... for possibly over 30 years... Maynard Hill owned just about every RC endurance, altitude, distance from takeoff to touchdown and other "feat" records in model aviation
      We got no business being that high. You could bring down an airliner.

      Woody

      Comment


      • Yeah i think its actually more fun to fpv low level to get more feel. Anything above 300ft the world below looks the same, especially on standard definition feeds.

        Comment


        • I sure would like to see Freewing come out with the Blue Angels F-18 Hornet in the 80-90mm size Edf!!! That would be so awesome to own and fly! Anyone else would like to see the same with this Edf?

          Comment


          • Originally posted by fhhuber View Post

            The unofficial (because they ruled an engine mod to be illegal.... he built his own supercharger) altitude record for RC in 1977, by Maynard Hill was appx 37.000 ft with a fixed wing model, no FPV, no gyro or other autopilot...
            It was a cover story for Model Aviation.
            He coordinated with US Navy (to borrow telescopic turret mounted binoculars) FAA, FAI and AMA for the attempt.

            It has been common for RC sailplanes winch launched or High Start launched (launches get them to about 500 to 700 ft) to exceed 3000 ft AGL which is about the limit of unaided (no binoculars or telescope) for over 40 years.

            Some of the initial YouTube videos that caught FAA attention about reckless RC flying were fixed wing models exceeding 7000 ft AGL with a solid cloud layer from 3500 to 5000 ft.

            Quads are definitively not the only things flying high.

            *****************

            BTW... for possibly over 30 years... Maynard Hill owned just about every RC endurance, altitude, distance from takeoff to touchdown and other "feat" records in model aviation
            Not to belittle Mr.Hill, there's a few things you failed to mention, like the trans-Atlantic crossing he flew. But most important was his occupation. You see, borrowing the optics from the Navy was easy for him because his "day job" was drone R&D for the Navy. From a certain POV his accomplishments would be akin to Werner Von Braun holding model rocket altitude records in the 1950s.

            Comment


            • ryan fireball

              Comment


              • Originally posted by paladin View Post
                ryan fireball
                I've always contended that North American utilized the FR-1 as a frame work for the T-28
                Warbird Charlie
                HSD Skyraider; FlightLine: Sea Fury; FMS 1400: P-40B, P-51, F4U, F6F, T-28, P-40E, 1700 F4U and a Fox glider; Freewing: A-6, P-51; VQ: P-39; Dynam: ME-262, FW-190, Waco; ASM A-26; ESM F7F-3
                Incinerator Loss 16

                Comment


                • Speaking as an, "Aviation Professional" if you keep below 400ft AGL I would consider you a safe model pilot. There is a flying field just of the end of the Van Nuys Airport in Southern California. I operate a Jet Ranger out of there from time to time. I always see all sorts of models flying beneath me when departing from there. There all below 400ft AGL, which in my opinion is where they should be.

                  Typically when helicopters enter a traffic pattern for an airport we come at 500ft AGL. Planes usually, (depending on the plane) never below 1000ft AGL. Planes operate at or above 1000ft AGL in even increments, 1000 - 2000- 3000ft etc. Helicopters at 500 - 1500 - 2500 etc. They do this to try to keep the planes, and helicopters at different altitudes, (Planes are pretty much straight line flyers, Helicopters are all ziggy, zaggy) they cross altitudes all the time, but as a GENERAL rule.

                  So if you look at Helo's never being below 500 ft AGL, if you stay below this I would consider yourself pretty safe, in general.

                  If your field is near a major urban area with lots of low flying traffic, you need to pay attention! Just pretend like your an official licensed pilot, and watch, "FOR ALL" traffic, manned and unmanned. You'll be fine.

                  If you're building & Flying larger turbine powered model aircraft,(Not the stuff that HSD sells, "Larger") you can expect a friendly visit from the FBI sometime soon. I said friendly, . Don't panic, they're just doing there jobs.

                  So ya got Joe Knobb, takes his DJI, out with a defeated altitude limit and a FPV set. Mr Knobb says I want to see how high I can get this bad boy to go! Pulls out the biggest battery he can fit in his quad, and takes off straight up, just as fast as he can go, has his FPV head set on, wow man, this is great! Serioiusly?

                  If you ever have the time to kill, on a nice clear blue day. Lay down on your back in the grass and just look straight up. Focus, look for anything you can see. The sky is full of planes man, it's a busy place up there. You do this, (it works a little better on a clear night, nav lights really carry a long way) and you'll understand my passion.

                  Best Regards, Fly Safe, You Fly Safe, I Fly Safe, We all get to keep flying.
                  Woody

                  PS this is basic stuff, we don't need an a commercial pilots briefing on commercial aircraft operations. Just basic stuff. W

                  Comment


                  • Nice commentary W.............but now lets move on past the FAA's latest shenanigans regarding our sport and get back to the topic of this thread
                    Warbird Charlie
                    HSD Skyraider; FlightLine: Sea Fury; FMS 1400: P-40B, P-51, F4U, F6F, T-28, P-40E, 1700 F4U and a Fox glider; Freewing: A-6, P-51; VQ: P-39; Dynam: ME-262, FW-190, Waco; ASM A-26; ESM F7F-3
                    Incinerator Loss 16

                    Comment


                    • Yuuup, probably not the right place for this. My sincere apologies.

                      Woody

                      Comment


                      • How about a Hawker Hurricane..and a Kawasaki KI-61 Hein. All in larger format 1400mm or better. And make a bigger version of the Sea Fury that's out now...whats up with these tiny planes? Some of us are old as dirt and those little birds just go "poof" lol

                        Comment


                        • An A 26 Invader with a 1600m span would be a good one.

                          Comment


                          • An A 26 Invader with a 1600mm span would be a good one.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Gilatrout View Post
                              I have to admit, I've caught the OV10 bug hard . I've started collecting reference material just in case.

                              ​​​​​​Gotta get me some OV10, and the prescription is flightline
                              Click image for larger version Name:	Gillespie09_OV-10A_Bronco_4123.jpg Views:	1 Size:	99.5 KB ID:	163538
                              YEAH,THAT!!!
                              Team Gross!

                              Comment


                              • My personal preference would be the F 35 as well built and put together as the F22.

                                Comment


                                • Originally posted by Woodcock View Post
                                  Speaking as an, "Aviation Professional" if you keep below 400ft AGL I would consider you a safe model pilot. There is a flying field just of the end of the Van Nuys Airport in Southern California. I operate a Jet Ranger out of there from time to time. I always see all sorts of models flying beneath me when departing from there. There all below 400ft AGL, which in my opinion is where they should be.

                                  Typically when helicopters enter a traffic pattern for an airport we come at 500ft AGL. Planes usually, (depending on the plane) never below 1000ft AGL. Planes operate at or above 1000ft AGL in even increments, 1000 - 2000- 3000ft etc. Helicopters at 500 - 1500 - 2500 etc. They do this to try to keep the planes, and helicopters at different altitudes, (Planes are pretty much straight line flyers, Helicopters are all ziggy, zaggy) they cross altitudes all the time, but as a GENERAL rule.

                                  So if you look at Helo's never being below 500 ft AGL, if you stay below this I would consider yourself pretty safe, in general.

                                  If your field is near a major urban area with lots of low flying traffic, you need to pay attention! Just pretend like your an official licensed pilot, and watch, "FOR ALL" traffic, manned and unmanned. You'll be fine.

                                  If you're building & Flying larger turbine powered model aircraft,(Not the stuff that HSD sells, "Larger") you can expect a friendly visit from the FBI sometime soon. I said friendly, . Don't panic, they're just doing there jobs.

                                  So ya got Joe Knobb, takes his DJI, out with a defeated altitude limit and a FPV set. Mr Knobb says I want to see how high I can get this bad boy to go! Pulls out the biggest battery he can fit in his quad, and takes off straight up, just as fast as he can go, has his FPV head set on, wow man, this is great! Serioiusly?

                                  If you ever have the time to kill, on a nice clear blue day. Lay down on your back in the grass and just look straight up. Focus, look for anything you can see. The sky is full of planes man, it's a busy place up there. You do this, (it works a little better on a clear night, nav lights really carry a long way) and you'll understand my passion.

                                  Best Regards, Fly Safe, You Fly Safe, I Fly Safe, We all get to keep flying.
                                  Woody

                                  PS this is basic stuff, we don't need an a commercial pilots briefing on commercial aircraft operations. Just basic stuff. W
                                  Come on Woody, we all know helicopters don't fly, they beat the air into submission.

                                  Comment


                                  • For the Jet boys and girls, How about the Lockheed X44A?

                                    Comment


                                    • Originally posted by Dual Prop Dave View Post
                                      For the Jet boys and girls, How about the Lockheed X44A?
                                      Actually, I'd rather have this:

                                      Comment


                                      • Wow, now that's one I hadn't considered before.

                                        Comment


                                        • Originally posted by fhhuber View Post

                                          The unofficial (because they ruled an engine mod to be illegal.... he built his own supercharger) altitude record for RC in 1977, by Maynard Hill was appx 37.000 ft with a fixed wing model, no FPV, no gyro or other autopilot...
                                          It was a cover story for Model Aviation.
                                          He coordinated with US Navy (to borrow telescopic turret mounted binoculars) FAA, FAI and AMA for the attempt.

                                          It has been common for RC sailplanes winch launched or High Start launched (launches get them to about 500 to 700 ft) to exceed 3000 ft AGL which is about the limit of unaided (no binoculars or telescope) for over 40 years.

                                          Some of the initial YouTube videos that caught FAA attention about reckless RC flying were fixed wing models exceeding 7000 ft AGL with a solid cloud layer from 3500 to 5000 ft.

                                          Quads are definitively not the only things flying high.

                                          *****************

                                          BTW... for possibly over 30 years... Maynard Hill owned just about every RC endurance, altitude, distance from takeoff to touchdown and other "feat" records in model aviation
                                          I know one record he doesn't hold
                                          TiredIron Aviation
                                          Tired Iron Military Vehicles

                                          Comment

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