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Eflite Cherokee

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  • ChloePug
    replied
    Hey Guys I'm new to RC planes & was hoping you could help. I got a Carbon Cub S & got pretty good w/ it so I got one of these cool looking Cherokees. Every-time I take off w/ this thing, I stall & eat dirt. I haven't used flaps on takeoff & have been taking off like I do w/ my cub (get the plane moving & then throttle up and pull back. This might be a dumb question, but how exactly do you take off w/ these Cherokees? I tried to get more gradual w/ my lift off, but the plan always starts pulling to the left on the runway... so I throttle up to get in the air & then stall...and crash lol. Do you constantly have to manipulate the controls to keep the plane straight as you're gaining speed on the ground?

    Also, on my Cub you can CLEARLY see the difference on the control surfaces when you toggle between safe/intermediate/advanced. This Cherokee is not like that...in fact to the naked eye, there's almost no difference between flight mode settings. When I stall, the plane so sensitive in it's handling that when I try to recover and right myself...it's all over the place and I eat a dirt sandwhich. It's leading me to believe that maybe the Safe mode isn't working or something. PLEASE HELP! I just want to get this beauty in the air.

    Link to my most recent crash below.


    https://youtu.be/0WkLF45ftyo

    Leave a comment:


  • BRGT350
    replied
    Rando, I use EMax ES008MA II servos in both of my Cherokees. They are reversed and use metal gears. If you are using the factory receiver, it is important to get reversed servos so the AS3x will work properly. I ran another 5 batteries through my Cherokee last night and I am really happy with how well the EMax servos are working. I had a not so perfect landing and hit a chipmunk hole on one of the landings, but no issues with the front gear steering arm or rudder servo thanks to the servo-saver being installed.

    For the EMax servos, make sure to check your throws and adjust accordingly. I found that the slight differences between the Spektrum and EMax servos and horns made the Cherokee a little too responsive in the air. She was flying more like a fighter plane than a Cherokee. I like my Cherokee very sedate and calm in the air, so a slight reduction in throw was all that was needed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Wakeley Jr.
    replied
    No problem Rando. It sure is strange being the one to help someone than being the one begging for it. Everything I know about planes, flying and related subjects I have learned myself from magazines and web sites. I'm fortunate in that I can pick up a book and learn anything. And I think I might even be a decent teacher, but that remains to be seen. In any case, theres a ton of guys on this site just waiting to help someone out. It feels good to give back and that's what I endeavor to do.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rando
    replied
    Thanks Bill and BRGT350. That helps a whole lot. Now I can decide what servos to get - hopefully Futaba has a suitable product. I suppose one could make a shallow cut in the foam to run the servo wires for flaps, and ailerons too for that matter. After a bit of fussing I discovered how the plastic connectors are assembled and come apart. That, along with your input, gave me all I need to accomplish the task. Thanks again.

    Leave a comment:


  • BRGT350
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Wakeley Jr. View Post
    The biggest aid I found to help servo removal was Sig CA Debonder. I first tried it with my Turbo Timber because I couildn't figure a way to cut the original servo out of the fuselage without carving the plane apart. However, a word to the wise - This stuff will remove a lot more stuff than glue if you leti it run amok inside your fuselage.
    Good tip, but you shouldn't need to use it on the Cherokee. None of the servos are glued into place. My Timber, much like your Turbo Timber, had the rudder and elevator servo glued into the fuselage. I used an x-acto knife and a bent paper clip to work around the servo to loosen the glue. Then used needle nose pliers to pull them out. Not the best solution, but worked. I think your debonder might have been better to use. I wonder about getting some shim stock, bending it into a 90 degree angle, and using that to work around the servo to break the glue.

    Leave a comment:


  • BRGT350
    replied
    Originally posted by Rando View Post
    I have never joined a forum before - of any kind - and I'm sure I'm not posting this properly, so a formal pardon is requested in advance. Here goes... I want to replace the stock servos in my Cherokee. The rudder and elevator servos appear simple enough to swap out as they are easily accessible. The aileron and flap servos in the wings are more of a challenge, at least for me. I assumed that the plastic "hands-free" servo connection plate on the wing needs to be removed to access the path for the servo wires/plugs to run through. After removing the 2 small, and 1 very small screws from the connection plate, I tried to pull it loose from the wing, but it wouldn't budge. I see that some folks have replaced this plane's servos and I'm curious as to how they went about doing so. Thanks
    The aileron servos come out pretty easy. There is an extension wire that runs from the servo wire to the wing-fuselage connector, so you don't need to disconnect the connector at the fuselage joint. Slowly pull the aileron servo out from the wing and the wire will unravel enough to access the plug. You don't want to pull hard and disconnect the wire inside the wing. Depending on the servo, you may need to enlarge the plastic retainer top and bottom. I used EMax servos and they needed a little work with a Dremel and file to open up the plastic to let the servo drop in. I had to open up the mounting holes in the servo for the rudder and elevator, but that wasn't hard either.

    As for the flap servos, I haven't found a good way to remove them. I have 2 Cherokees and no luck getting the flap servo out on either. It appears the wing halves were glued together with the servo installed and there isn't a window in the foam to pull the plug through. Given how little I use flaps, I decided to just leave the factory servos. The aileron, rudder, and elevator servos have all been replaced. I also added a servo-saver on the nose gear steering push-rod. That should take some load off of the servo and steering tiller arm in case you have a landing that isn't perfect or are operating off of grass.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Wakeley Jr.
    replied
    The biggest aid I found to help servo removal was Sig CA Debonder. I first tried it with my Turbo Timber because I couildn't figure a way to cut the original servo out of the fuselage without carving the plane apart. However, a word to the wise - This stuff will remove a lot more stuff than glue if you leti it run amok inside your fuselage.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rando
    replied
    I have never joined a forum before - of any kind - and I'm sure I'm not posting this properly, so a formal pardon is requested in advance. Here goes... I want to replace the stock servos in my Cherokee. The rudder and elevator servos appear simple enough to swap out as they are easily accessible. The aileron and flap servos in the wings are more of a challenge, at least for me. I assumed that the plastic "hands-free" servo connection plate on the wing needs to be removed to access the path for the servo wires/plugs to run through. After removing the 2 small, and 1 very small screws from the connection plate, I tried to pull it loose from the wing, but it wouldn't budge. I see that some folks have replaced this plane's servos and I'm curious as to how they went about doing so. Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Wakeley Jr.
    replied
    YES!:Cool:

    Leave a comment:


  • xviper
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Wakeley Jr. View Post

    Now if I could just get her to charge my batteries......
    A bit on the personal side, no? LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • Hoomi
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Wakeley Jr. View Post

    Now if I could just get her to charge my batteries......
    Oh, the double-entendre fun we could have with that phrase! LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Wakeley Jr.
    replied
    Originally posted by Alpha View Post

    Thanks, Bill, I'm just trying to do my part. Positivity Wins.

    Good on your wife, too! Anyone who after a crash kisses you and says to buy another plane is a real keeper!
    Now if I could just get her to charge my batteries......

    Leave a comment:


  • Alpha
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Wakeley Jr. View Post

    I knew a man who lived in my neighborhood when I was a kid in high school that could make me feel better about anything bad that happened to me Failed algebra? So what. Lost a $20 bill at school? Well there must have been someone that needed it more than you. Grounded over a speeding ticket? Yah that sucks, but the speed felt fantastic didn't it!?!? YOU remind me so much of him it's hard believing we've never spoken. Thank you for stepping in on that one conversation I had that was about to turn nasty. Thanks for considering my advice about trying new things, like the Maule receiver in my Kingfisher. And thanks for considering the depth of my self imposed feelings of failure. Man I did not want to face my wife with the busted up plane in my hand. But I did and she kissed me and said " Well, you better get on the web and buy that other plane you've been looking at..." There it was. Permission to buy the Turbo Timber! Less than 10 minutes later I had one on the way. So, thanks again for being there. I hope I can help you someday. Bill
    Thanks, Bill, I'm just trying to do my part. Positivity Wins.

    Good on your wife, too! Anyone who after a crash kisses you and says to buy another plane is a real keeper!

    Leave a comment:


  • BRGT350
    replied
    Bill, very sorry to hear about your crash. When I crashed my first Cherokee, I didn't sleep for a few days. It was my first crash that was beyond repair and was with my favorite plane. My wife was super pissed too, which did not help. Since I couldn't sleep, I went out to the garage and conducted a full investigation. Took everything apart, photographed it, took videos, and wrote down notes. I recalled the exact conditions, location, and events that lead to the crash. I was the mini-NTSB. I found the crash was a servo failure that triggered a spin on take-off that I lacked the altitude or skill to recover. I put together my findings and then went to bed. The crash lead me to replace all nylon/plastic gear servos on the Cherokee, Timber, and next my B-17's. I also realized the large diameter pushrod for the nose gear could easily transmit high loads into the servo, hence the servo saver addition. While the crash shook me up, I learned from it and made improvements. Sadly, I still don't have the confidence to fly either of my new Cherokees yet. I crashed in August, and still haven't flown either of my Cherokees. I get them down from the ceiling, taxi them around the driveway, conduct dozens of servo and system checks, and then put them back away. I got one of them down last night and told myself that it is time to fly it. No more collecting dust. I have logged plenty of flights this spring to remind myself I can fly, just need to get the Cherokee in the air to tell myself it can fly too.

    Learn from the crash, make changes to prevent another, and get back in the air. Don't be like me and leave the planes at home and lose the confidence.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hoomi
    replied
    Whenever I start to feel bad about crashing, I go watch some Flite Test videos on Youtube. Those guys aren't afraid to show their crashes (which they always say teach them something), and they usually laugh about them.

    I still can't quite laugh off my crashes, but it does help knowing that I'm not the only one, and that crashing is just part of the hobby.

    I'm currently working on replacing the destroyed wings of my Sensei with new wings built from foamboard. I figure, even if it doesn't work out well, it's been a learning experience.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Wakeley Jr.
    replied
    Originally posted by Alpha View Post

    Take heart, Bill! Post some photos of the damage and we can better assess how to go about fixing it.

    As for crashing over the past four years, I admire your tenacity and persistence. I crash a lot, and I'm a firm believer that it helps us become better pilots. If you're not crashing, you're not flying hard enough.

    Run some flights with your Kingfisher to get back in the groove, and if I could offer a helpful tip, it would be to practice Touch and Go passes. In general I think landing is something that people think of once the timer goes off. I'd encourage the opposite thinking, especially for beginners or intermediate pilots looking to advance to the next level of confidence. Takeoff is optional, but landing is mandatory.
    I knew a man who lived in my neighborhood when I was a kid in high school that could make me feel better about anything bad that happened to me Failed algebra? So what. Lost a $20 bill at school? Well there must have been someone that needed it more than you. Grounded over a speeding ticket? Yah that sucks, but the speed felt fantastic didn't it!?!? YOU remind me so much of him it's hard believing we've never spoken. Thank you for stepping in on that one conversation I had that was about to turn nasty. Thanks for considering my advice about trying new things, like the Maule receiver in my Kingfisher. And thanks for considering the depth of my self imposed feelings of failure. Man I did not want to face my wife with the busted up plane in my hand. But I did and she kissed me and said " Well, you better get on the web and buy that other plane you've been looking at..." There it was. Permission to buy the Turbo Timber! Less than 10 minutes later I had one on the way. So, thanks again for being there. I hope I can help you someday. Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • Alpha
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Wakeley Jr. View Post
    Well, it happened. After all the time and care I spent setting up my Cherokee, with different Velcro schemes and a servo saver was swept away with one bad angle of attack. I was in thick fog Monday morning and flying close so as not to lose my plane in the fog. Timer ran out - time to land. I had a hard time picking a visual marker with which to line up my landing. So I came in a little too fast and way to steep and, you guessed it, she hit the deck, HARD, leaving the front wheel and its guts strewn down the grass strip and a big whole in the belly of the plane where the fin on the wheel pants penetrated it. I could've just sat down in the fog and screamed. Ive wrecked a lot of planes teaching myself to fly. I went through three Sport cubs and a Super Cub before my wife surprised me with a simulator. I spent hours everyday with that thing and the following spring, with a brand new UMX Timber, I put together my first successful start to finish flight. That was 4 years ago and I'd like to think Ive gotten to be a decent pilot but this has cut my confidence down to the quick. I bought a Turbo Timber that I'm setting up now and I flew my Kingfisher this morning so I'm starting to feel a little better. If anyone knows how much its going to cost and how involved the repair is please give me an idea as my airplane account is dry for a bit.
    Take heart, Bill! Post some photos of the damage and we can better assess how to go about fixing it.

    As for crashing over the past four years, I admire your tenacity and persistence. I crash a lot, and I'm a firm believer that it helps us become better pilots. If you're not crashing, you're not flying hard enough.

    Run some flights with your Kingfisher to get back in the groove, and if I could offer a helpful tip, it would be to practice Touch and Go passes. In general I think landing is something that people think of once the timer goes off. I'd encourage the opposite thinking, especially for beginners or intermediate pilots looking to advance to the next level of confidence. Takeoff is optional, but landing is mandatory.

    Leave a comment:


  • xviper
    replied
    Not seeing the plane in person, it's hard to say how much work and money it would take to repair it. See what you can repair and price out the other parts. Sometimes, if you really like the plane, it's almost cheaper and less work to buy a whole new plane and strip the old one down for spares.
    For future reference .................................. Don't fly in fog. Real pilots that fly only VFR, never do on purpose. It's hard to judge range and ceiling and reference points go away very quickly. Fog and mist also move. It's not constant. Trying to fly "in close" is not always a solution as this cramps your style and pushes the limits of your skill. Besides, "close" doesn't mean anything when the fog moves in and shifts around. You shouldn't get too beat up about it because it wasn't necessarily your skill that was in question. It was your judgement to fly in poor conditions. Next time when you see similar conditions, you won't fly. I've crashed a plane due to low lying cloud (basically fog that's not on the ground). I did it once. I've never flown in that kind of condition again. If you're smart, this is one mistake that is easily identifiable and you learn from it and don't do it again.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Wakeley Jr.
    replied
    Well, it happened. After all the time and care I spent setting up my Cherokee, with different Velcro schemes and a servo saver was swept away with one bad angle of attack. I was in thick fog Monday morning and flying close so as not to lose my plane in the fog. Timer ran out - time to land. I had a hard time picking a visual marker with which to line up my landing. So I came in a little too fast and way to steep and, you guessed it, she hit the deck, HARD, leaving the front wheel and its guts strewn down the grass strip and a big whole in the belly of the plane where the fin on the wheel pants penetrated it. I could've just sat down in the fog and screamed. Ive wrecked a lot of planes teaching myself to fly. I went through three Sport cubs and a Super Cub before my wife surprised me with a simulator. I spent hours everyday with that thing and the following spring, with a brand new UMX Timber, I put together my first successful start to finish flight. That was 4 years ago and I'd like to think Ive gotten to be a decent pilot but this has cut my confidence down to the quick. I bought a Turbo Timber that I'm setting up now and I flew my Kingfisher this morning so I'm starting to feel a little better. If anyone knows how much its going to cost and how involved the repair is please give me an idea as my airplane account is dry for a bit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Wakeley Jr.
    replied
    Originally posted by BRGT350 View Post
    here is a tip concerning the Velcro placed on the tray. Due to the small amount of surface area on the tray for the Velcro to stick to, use a piece of Velcro that is about an inch or so longer than the tray. Take the excess Velcro and wrap it around the leading and trailing edge of the tray. If you have enough, the excess will go far enough to stick to the Velcro on the top of the tray. This makes the adhesive stick to itself and around the ends of the tray. It took me taking out my battery with the Velcro coming off the tray to figure out a better way. I tried gluing it too, but the excess wrapping around the tray works the best.

    Another tip, I chris-cross the Velcro straps across the top of the battery. I find it easier to get them tight this way. The rear-most strap barely touches the battery to get the CG right with a 2200 3S, so crossing the straps fixes that problem too.
    Hey that's a great way to cure the Velcro strap situation. Thanks for the ideas, I appreciate them!

    Leave a comment:

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