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Eflite Cherokee

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  • Hoomi
    replied
    I went back to the instruction manual and looked up how to program the dual rates, and set aileron, stabilator, and rudder at 60% for low rates. I may play around with the expo, based on your settings, and see how it goes.

    Especially when learning a plane, boring is actually good. Flying it yesterday at full rates, my nerves were a bit frazzled by the time I landed. As I commented in the "What did you fly today?" topic, the flight was so twitchy that I half expected to see that my little pilot guy had hurled all over the cockpit!

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  • BRGT350
    replied
    I have 20% expo on the ailerons and 30% on the stabilator. Ailerons at 90% throw, elevator at 85%, rudder at 100% at 15% expo. I don't consider the Cherokee to be overly responsive with these settings, but rather it feels like a real Cherokee. Somewhat slow to respond and not twitchy at all. I fly the plane very scale with little stick inputs. For somebody watching, it is the most boring plane in the air at our club. No rolls, no loops, nothing that looks any different than what a real Cherokee would be doing. Just cruising around the sky.

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  • Hoomi
    replied
    Second flight today did reasonably well, other than I need to figure out why my rates switch on the transmitter doesn't change anything on the control. The Cherokee is so responsive, that I really need to use lower rates, at least until I'm a lot more familiar with it. The landing wasn't pretty, but any landing that doesn't cause any damage is okay.

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  • BRGT350
    replied
    I use half flaps for take-off, half-flaps on landing if there is any wind, and full flaps if it is calm. I found that if there is any wind with full flaps that the plane hangs in the air in ground effect until it stalls and plops on the runway. I had one of those landings and decided I didn't like it. No damage or anything, but it looked terrible and could easily lead to a problem. I have also reduced the full flap throw on my second Cherokee. With full flaps, she will slow down to a crawl. I had tried to use half flaps on final approach until I was just about a few feet off the ground and then went to full flaps. With the 4 second deployment time, the plane touches down about the time the flaps are fully down. This slowed the plane for the last few feet, but still had enough airspeed to not worry about it getting hung up in ground effect.

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  • Hoomi
    replied
    That's my plan with the servo savers also - strictly nose wheel steering.

    BRGT, do you use half or full flaps for take-off? On my maiden flight with the Cherokee, I didn't use the flaps on take-off, but lowered them for landing.

    I think next flight, I'm going to try a few passes over the runway with the flaps at full, half, and none, and see what kind of difference it makes in low-speed passes. I'm not sure if I'll get out to the field to fly tomorrow, or wait until Sunday. Tomorrow morning in the annual El Tour de Tucson, so we're going to have something like 10,000 bicyclists riding a circuitous route around the city, and I think the route crosses my path to the flying field. On El Tour day, local police take control of the intersections, and hold back automobile traffic for the bicycles. That isn't a complaint - I've ridden in El Tour a few times myself, and it's both a great ride, and a great boon to the community. When I'm not riding it, though, I avoid the route so as to reduce the traffic congestion, and save myself some time in the delays.

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  • BRGT350
    replied
    Yep, that is a servo saver. Yes, it does take away from control as there are a pair of springs that transmit inputs to the push rod. For the nose gear, I am ok giving up a little steering response to take loading off the servo and the plastic pieces. I don't taxi the Cherokee, but rather walk it out to the runway, point it into the wind, lower the flaps, and start pouring on the throttle. The take-off distance is pretty short and I don't need a lot of steering input to keep it straight. I don't need much steering on landing either. Once she is down, I walk out to the runway to get her. Chances of finding a chipmunk hole, divot, or something else lurking in the grass is too much of a risk. I see the servo saver and metal gear servo as a belt and suspenders approach to protecting from another servo failure that leads to a crash. I wouldn't use the servo saver on any control surfaces. The nice thing with the servo saver is that if I decide it reduces the response of the nose wheel too much, I can compress the springs further or just remove it completely. I plan on only using them on nose gear applications where the rudder and landing gear on are on the same servo. No need on a tail dragger.

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  • OV10
    replied
    What RM said.;) Here's a link. https://www.motionrc.com/products/du...de-servo-saver
    It is old school however, before the advent of metal gear servo's.
    Adds another layer of variance into the control system whether it steering or surfaces.:Scared:

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  • rifleman_btx
    replied
    Its a spring back device that keeps shock loads off the servo. Keeps the servo from shredding gears.

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  • dkalwishky
    replied
    What is a "servo saver"?

    Leave a comment:


  • Hoomi
    replied
    Replacement steering mounts arrived today. I bought two, figuring if the first broke that easily, it might be a good idea to always have a spare on hand.

    Terry at Small Parts CNC is looking into buying a Cherokee for himself, so if everything works out, we might just have an upgrade steering mount available to us.

    I should have the Servo Savers I ordered from MRC within the next week as well. I ordered two, figuring on installing one on the Cherokee, and if I can make it fit, one for the Sensei.

    Leave a comment:


  • BRGT350
    replied
    Callie really knocked it out of the park with the Cherokee. She has the size and scale correct where everything fit as I had hoped. We only had a few pictures of the actual plane to work from and they were all at odd angles. She was able to use what was available and come up with the graphics. The cowl and window vents also were a nice touch that really made the plane stand out.

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  • CaptAmerica
    replied
    Looks awesome! I might have to have Callie make graphics for mine. Didn't even think about it when I repainted my Cherokee.

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  • BRGT350
    replied
    E-Flite Cherokee N9058J project by Bryan Redeker, on Flickr

    Finally got one wing and the stabilator installed. Waiting on adding the anti-slip surface to the other wing before I install it. Really happy with how it is turning out! Callie did an outstanding job with the graphics, cowl vents, and window vent.

    Leave a comment:


  • BRGT350
    replied
    Thanks Mrmat01, it is has been a long journey to get this one looking the way I wanted. I am hoping to get it assembled and photographed in front of the hanger the real one was based out of from 1966-1978 before winter takes over.

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  • mrmat01
    replied
    :Cool:Wow that’s outstanding work sir:Drooling:

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  • BRGT350
    replied
    Slowly making progress on my Cherokee project. Started installing the fuselage graphics this weekend.
    E-Flite Cherokee N9058J project by Bryan Redeker, on Flickr

    E-Flite Cherokee N9058J project by Bryan Redeker, on Flickr

    Leave a comment:


  • Hoomi
    replied
    One other reason I'm going to try the 3x10mm, is to see if that also makes it easier to reach the screws when removing the wing at the flying field.

    I didn't get rid of the 3x8mm screws, so if it seems they don't fit right, I can switch right back to the original.

    Leave a comment:


  • BRGT350
    replied
    Hoomi, in my build video, I used the wrong screws for the wings and landing gear. I missed it in the manual and thought for sure the long screws attach the wing and small screws attach the gear, which is like almost every plane I assembled. I am sure the short screws are ok. When my Cherokee crashed, the screws held the plastic section of the wings to the fuselage, while the wings completely separated from the plastic part and spar. The wing screws are in double shear, so they are pretty strong. I would have thought there would have been way more thread engagement, but it seems to be strong enough to survive an accident in which the entire plane came apart.

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  • Hoomi
    replied
    I sent Terry at Small Parts CNC a series of photos of the broken part and the associated parts, so he can get a good idea whether they can machine an upgrade for an affordable price.

    Removing it took a little thinking. I ended up poking a small screwdriver through the top of the fuselage (there was a dot there that I think was intended to mark right where to do so), to unscrew the arm from the top of the strut-sleeve (for lack of knowing a better name for it). I'm not sure how long it will take to get the replacements from Horizon. I glued the broken tab back on for the photograph, so Terry could see what it should look like, but I wouldn't trust the glue to hold it well enough to handle a dirt runway landing.

    One other question for owners - did anyone think the 3x8mm screws to secure the wing weren't quite long enough to adequately engage the threads? I picked up some 3x10mm, and will see how those feel. As much as the screws didn't want to come out after Thursday's flight, I don't think there was any danger of a wing falling off in flight, but even when I fit-checked the screws in a loose wing, it doesn't seem like they are long enough to really grip the threads on the opposite fitting. I think the 3x10 screws will hold better, and with a little more length to be pushed back up, probably easier to remove.

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  • DzlDk
    replied
    I came in too steep and broke the exact same part :^/ must be a common thing... Great flying, fun flying plane though!!

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