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Parkzone T-28 vs Eflite T-28

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  • Parkzone T-28 vs Eflite T-28

    Been tearing my self apart when looking at these two planes.

    Why?

    -Well it's because of me being new, getting back in the hobby.
    -Space at the farm. We have a few natural areas where I've started to learn to descend/approach make a 90 degree turn and descend and land.
    Parkzone had going for it: Price, size (feel more comfortable with 1m planes), still had landing gear (I wonder how those pencil sticks fair in grass)

    Eflite is bigger, heavier, will buff the wind but more money. More riding on the line of cost if I down it. Yes, I don’t think highly of my skill set because of the mishaps I’ve had. I have a P47 which I buddy box with a friend, only flew it once. My p51 I flew many times but landings (nose overs) were a issue. Started learning and doing well with those here at the farm and one day lost my deprecation so it needs to be rebuilt. My skills are great with Timber, Cubs, etc (high wing planes). My Carbon Cub S I put a power 10 motor on it and has unlimited vertical.
    Flaps aren’t a deal breaker but landing gear are. I want a plane that will mimics what a real war bird needs to land like. I need to get use to landing with more speed and staying on the throttle.
    I have a parkzone Wildcat, which is one of my favorite planes because it's better for the area I feel like, gives me some error
    Planes
    -E-Flite: 1.2m P-47, Maule, Turbo Timber, 1.5m AT-6, 1.2m T-28, Dallas Doll, Viper, F-15, F-16, Wildcat, Carbon Cub -UMX: Mig-15, Pitts, Timber
    -FMS: Bae Hawk Motion: 1.6m Corsair, 850mm Mustang, 1.6m Spitfire Freewing: 1.7m A-10, F-22,

  • #2
    TG65..........Comparing the Parkzone to the Eflite is apple/orange .
    Yeah the Eflite is $130 more but it also has all the warbird features you are gonna want like flaps and retracts.
    Don't overlook the Dynam version which is priced about $40 more than the PZ and $90 less than the EF and basically has all the features that the Eflite has.
    The Dynam is the trike warbird trainer that I promoted as entry level to several newer pilots at my old club and it took the abuse that it got handed very well.
    Warbird Charlie
    HSD Skyraider; FlightLine: Sea Fury; FMS 1400: P-40B, P-51, F4U, F6F, T-28, P-40E, 1700 F4U and a Fox glider; Freewing: A-6, P-51; VQ: P-39; Dynam: ME-262, FW-190, Waco; ASM A-26; ESM F7F-3; LX PBJ-1
    Incinerator Loss 16

    Comment


    • #3
      Thought the general imporess of the Dynam is, well it's cheap to put it bluntly.
      Planes
      -E-Flite: 1.2m P-47, Maule, Turbo Timber, 1.5m AT-6, 1.2m T-28, Dallas Doll, Viper, F-15, F-16, Wildcat, Carbon Cub -UMX: Mig-15, Pitts, Timber
      -FMS: Bae Hawk Motion: 1.6m Corsair, 850mm Mustang, 1.6m Spitfire Freewing: 1.7m A-10, F-22,

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by thisguy65 View Post
        Thought the general imporess of the Dynam is, well it's cheap to put it bluntly.
        Then you won't be happy with the PZ also, the Dynam is actually better than it.
        The Dynam's are "economical" and actually are a good value for folks that are concerned with costs.
        Warbird Charlie
        HSD Skyraider; FlightLine: Sea Fury; FMS 1400: P-40B, P-51, F4U, F6F, T-28, P-40E, 1700 F4U and a Fox glider; Freewing: A-6, P-51; VQ: P-39; Dynam: ME-262, FW-190, Waco; ASM A-26; ESM F7F-3; LX PBJ-1
        Incinerator Loss 16

        Comment


        • #5
          I've got a parkzone wildcat and been really happy with it. I did end up picking up a PZ T-28 today. Couldn't pass it up for the price. Pretty fun plane, but it loves to float for a low wing.
          Planes
          -E-Flite: 1.2m P-47, Maule, Turbo Timber, 1.5m AT-6, 1.2m T-28, Dallas Doll, Viper, F-15, F-16, Wildcat, Carbon Cub -UMX: Mig-15, Pitts, Timber
          -FMS: Bae Hawk Motion: 1.6m Corsair, 850mm Mustang, 1.6m Spitfire Freewing: 1.7m A-10, F-22,

          Comment


          • #6
            Two very nice little planes indeed.

            Comment


            • #7
              A T-28 in any size is a winner IMO. My very first plane was the FMS 55" and it's still one of my favorite planes.

              Comment


              • #8

                And here in lay the real problem with learning to fly or should I say, land an Rc model.
                I have witnessed countless landing phase accidents from newer Rc pilots because they either want a complex warbird model or are told by someone else to buy a complex warbird before they are ready and it’s a mishap waiting to happen. Hard landings ruin retracts.
                TG65 also flies from a farm. Not the spectacular paved flying fields I’ve so often drooled over. Yes, I to fly from seriously rough ground and a rock runway. Those conditions beat smaller retracts up like nothing else.
                To keep the learning curve moving in a positive direction and provide the best all round beat me to death airframe, NOTHING out there comes close to the PZ T-28.
                Its cheap, rugged, and easily repairable. While it is floaty on a 3s 2200mAh, a 3300mAh will fit with a lil opening up and the model loves the extra weight.
                For the past seven years I have owned a PZ T-28 for two reasons. Once winter is over it’s the first airplane I fly for some quick brush up and it’s my primary trainer for anyone new who wants to learn to fly.
                Fact is, it’s a diamond in the rough. Pull it’s awefulness out of the box and go straight at cleaning it up. In a day or two you’ll have the best low wing trainer available. The skinny gear are fine, just go with bigger tires. I used the FL P-38 ones on mine. https://www.motionrc.com/products/fl...pe-b-w70413146
                Every advanced RC pilot I fly with at our local park has a PZ T-28 and we all love them and swear by them. Many times we fly them together for fun.
                This is an airplane to practice landings with. Put battery after battery into it and just shoot landings all afternoon, hundreds of them, no retract failure...
                I gave my first one to a friend who need a parts airframe, it had something like 400 plus flights on it and probably over 10,000 landings. Never had to fix a retract...
                I bought a second one two winters past and installed a gyro that can be switched on or off for training purposes.

                Mark out a 10 foot wide by 40 foot long section of grass to land on. When you can successfully land a T-28 on that every time, you may move up to something faster. You should actually be able to land a PZ T-28 in a 5 by 20 foot area. Grass runways must always be cut short, down to an inch if possible! To land something faster and heavier with retracts will require the ground be level and smooth with very short grass. Landing gear doors must also be trimmed up on tail dragging models so they don’t grab the grass and flip it over.

                The Eflite T-28 is more suited to an individual who has stick time on landings and has a manicured grass or paved runway to land on, as are all other heavier bigger warbirds.

                Click image for larger version  Name:	5A9196D6-50E4-4439-80D3-5FF123BBE364.jpeg Views:	1 Size:	125.1 KB ID:	171689Click image for larger version  Name:	F5327A38-EB17-4CBE-919D-D583F959C012.jpeg Views:	1 Size:	122.2 KB ID:	171690Click image for larger version  Name:	2A2D3B7F-27A5-44F2-A4A5-EEA6F9D869C2.jpeg Views:	1 Size:	140.3 KB ID:	171691Click image for larger version  Name:	685E4326-7F97-4389-91D1-9A63535B7010.jpeg Views:	1 Size:	153.2 KB ID:	171692

                Comment


                • #9
                  One other thing to note here is what was actually experienced during WWII and the documented accident rates.
                  In the first 32 months of the war, non combat related accidents numbered in the tens of thousands. In the continental US alone, over 11,000 aircraft were lost to crashes while only 7,700 were lost in combat.
                  The transition from training aircraft to full blown warbirds cost was astoundingly bad.

                  Spend the extra time to fly a trainer and land it with extreme precision before you transition into a warbird.
                  Or, your just setting yourself up to fail.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by thisguy65 View Post
                    I've got a parkzone wildcat and been really happy with it. I did end up picking up a PZ T-28 today. Couldn't pass it up for the price. Pretty fun plane, but it loves to float for a low wing.
                    Wing loading is wingloading regardless if it’s a high wing or low wing. And while I owned my full scale 182, May Cherokee owners would say their plane would float more in landing configuration than my high wing. I’ve flown both, and with the same wing loading, could tell no difference.

                    With that said, I think what you’re saying is a low wing such as a warbird vs a high wing like a trainer.

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      ‘And high or low, attributes on float in ground affect are directly related to onboard weight and landing speed.

                      If a pilot takes off from a 6,000 foot runway with three passengers and full fuel tanks then flies 20 minutes to another 6,000 foot runway and uses the landing speed prescribed in the manual, the airplane will float very little if at all. High or low wing. Airspeeds stated in light aircraft manuals are calculated at max certificated gross weight.
                      Now drop the three passengers off and fly the same airplane till it’s nearly out of gas and try to land on a 1,500 foot grass strip using the same approach speed as stated in the manual. Once you enter ground affect all it wants to do is float because the wings are supporting less weight at too fast an airspeed. There is a formula to recalculate all V speeds by weight.

                      This is is very relevant for Rc pilots because as an Rc pilot you cannot just glance down at the instrument panel and maintain a specific airspeed using pitch input. Flying Rc requires us to visually guess a models airspeed. Fly it in too fast and you will float, slow it down too much and you stall. Hard enough learning to land a real airplane but sometimes it seems impossible to master Rc landings especially in windy conditions.
                      Floating or not floating in ground affect is always about weight and approach airspeed.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        One thing that is nice about the older PZ T-28, is the availability of spare parts. Well, at least at my local hobby shop. There is always a good amount of Parkzone/Hobbyzone spare parts on the racks. For a trainer, spares are vital. Back when I was learning with my Hobbyzone Super Cub, I could crash in the morning, head to the hobby shop to get a new prop or cowl, and be back in the air later that day. Eventually I got to the point where the spares weren't needed anymore and spare part availability wasn't as big of a concern. I still like having the ability to get spare parts, sometimes not due to a crash, but rather to modify or have spares on hand for parts that are usually going to need replacement. I had to wait 7 months for a spare set of retracts from Hobbyking on my B-17. I wanted an extra set after damaging a wire on one of them. Thankfully another B-17 pilot had a spare set to send to me while I waited for the HK ones. If you are a newer pilot flying a trainer, and it is the only plane you have, waiting 7 months for a critical part kind of sucks. That is a pretty rare example, but something to keep in mind.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm relatively new to the hobby and the Eflite T-28 was my second plane after an Apprentice. It is a fantastic flying airplane. Two things I would say to watch out for.

                          One is keep an eye on the control surfaces from time to time as they are glued without hinges just to fix if you get any separation. Foam-Tac is great for making a hinge.

                          The nose strut is the next item because it's wire with no shock absorber capability. A 3 point landing will likely result in having to bend the strut back straight. If you can set it on the mains first every time it will be fine and you can bend it back if it happens without a problem. MotionRC also sells a nose strut with shock absorber that fits it for about $25 if I remember correctly but you'd have to ask which one it is. I'd say try it as is first. You will love the airplanes flight characteristics.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Ole-Timer View Post
                            And here in lay the real problem with learning to fly or should I say, land an Rc model.
                            I have witnessed countless landing phase accidents from newer Rc pilots because they either want a complex warbird model or are told by someone else to buy a complex warbird before they are ready and it’s a mishap waiting to happen. Hard landings ruin retracts.
                            TG65 also flies from a farm. Not the spectacular paved flying fields I’ve so often drooled over. Yes, I to fly from seriously rough ground and a rock runway. Those conditions beat smaller retracts up like nothing else.
                            To keep the learning curve moving in a positive direction and provide the best all round beat me to death airframe, NOTHING out there comes close to the PZ T-28.
                            Its cheap, rugged, and easily repairable. While it is floaty on a 3s 2200mAh, a 3300mAh will fit with a lil opening up and the model loves the extra weight.
                            For the past seven years I have owned a PZ T-28 for two reasons. Once winter is over it’s the first airplane I fly for some quick brush up and it’s my primary trainer for anyone new who wants to learn to fly.
                            Fact is, it’s a diamond in the rough. Pull it’s awefulness out of the box and go straight at cleaning it up. In a day or two you’ll have the best low wing trainer available. The skinny gear are fine, just go with bigger tires. I used the FL P-38 ones on mine. https://www.motionrc.com/products/fl...pe-b-w70413146
                            Every advanced RC pilot I fly with at our local park has a PZ T-28 and we all love them and swear by them. Many times we fly them together for fun.
                            This is an airplane to practice landings with. Put battery after battery into it and just shoot landings all afternoon, hundreds of them, no retract failure...
                            I gave my first one to a friend who need a parts airframe, it had something like 400 plus flights on it and probably over 10,000 landings. Never had to fix a retract...
                            I bought a second one two winters past and installed a gyro that can be switched on or off for training purposes.

                            Mark out a 10 foot wide by 40 foot long section of grass to land on. When you can successfully land a T-28 on that every time, you may move up to something faster. You should actually be able to land a PZ T-28 in a 5 by 20 foot area. Grass runways must always be cut short, down to an inch if possible! To land something faster and heavier with retracts will require the ground be level and smooth with very short grass. Landing gear doors must also be trimmed up on tail dragging models so they don’t grab the grass and flip it over.

                            The Eflite T-28 is more suited to an individual who has stick time on landings and has a manicured grass or paved runway to land on, as are all other heavier bigger warbirds.

                            Click image for larger version Name:	5A9196D6-50E4-4439-80D3-5FF123BBE364.jpeg Views:	1 Size:	125.1 KB ID:	171689Click image for larger version Name:	F5327A38-EB17-4CBE-919D-D583F959C012.jpeg Views:	1 Size:	122.2 KB ID:	171690Click image for larger version Name:	2A2D3B7F-27A5-44F2-A4A5-EEA6F9D869C2.jpeg Views:	1 Size:	140.3 KB ID:	171691Click image for larger version Name:	685E4326-7F97-4389-91D1-9A63535B7010.jpeg Views:	1 Size:	153.2 KB ID:	171692
                            Honestly my favorite part of flying, is landing. Don't know what it is. I've taken the tractor and skid steer to level our a area. Just due to the trees and some power lines my lands do some in a little hot. Trying ways to bleed speed of quicker. Typically I'll kill power (depending on plane), desend (picking up speed). Then level off and as I start to slow down, apply throttle to keep a good speed.
                            Planes
                            -E-Flite: 1.2m P-47, Maule, Turbo Timber, 1.5m AT-6, 1.2m T-28, Dallas Doll, Viper, F-15, F-16, Wildcat, Carbon Cub -UMX: Mig-15, Pitts, Timber
                            -FMS: Bae Hawk Motion: 1.6m Corsair, 850mm Mustang, 1.6m Spitfire Freewing: 1.7m A-10, F-22,

                            Comment

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