Motion RC

You must Sign-in or Register to post messages in the Hobby Squawk community
Registration is FREE and only takes a few moments

Register now

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Blitzrcworks V22 Osprey advice

Collapse
X
Collapse
First Prev Next Last
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Blitzrcworks V22 Osprey advice

    I spent the afternoon building this aircraft. Very simple and straightforward. I'm on step 5 the "Function check". Channel 5 is responsible for changing between horizontal and vertical flight. Says to check motor nacelle position to a picture that's crummy. I went ahead and completed the throttle calibration. When it was safe I powered to half throttle. It slowly inched forward, so I powered down. Does this mean I need to move the motor nacelle to a more upright position. Or is this normal. Says I can also center with transmitter sub trim. Anyone with experience on this is much appreciated.

  • #2
    Hi Skyboom, As I recall, when I flew the Osprey last year, what you're describing is normal. You're going to want a slight amount of forward drift for your maiden before you get used to transitioning into and out of hover. The Osprey had a tendency to rock aft and oscillate while in hover if flown in a certain way. It's not difficult to learn how it needs to be flown, but at least for me, it was not an immediately natural process.

    For your maiden, I recommend only hovering, and getting used to those control inputs, response time, and observe overall stability. Also watch your timer! On subsequent flights, I recommend minimizing the time spent hovering, since it's the least efficient mode. Take off, transition to forward flight, fly, then transition back when ready to land.

    Comment


    • #3
      Oh good advice. Then I'll leave it the way it is. I'm getting it ready for Sunday afternoon. Was thinking of setting some small screws into the tail section that required glueing. Just to strengthen it up. Not much left to do on it, some Velcro stripping and cosmetic things. Great then all is good .Thankyou.

      Comment


      • #4
        I've been flying mine for some time now (over a year). I strongly suggest you view the videos that Pete has made on this plane, especially the one that tells you to do the flight controller initialization each and every time you fly it. It involves rapidly flipping the flight mode switch up to 15 times. His first video is also very educational. He warns you to always do the transition INTO the wind. I have another warning for you. NEVER attempt to hover the plane backwards or use too much back ELE when trying to slow down against a stiff wind. This will confuse the flight controller and it will flip upside down and go crazy. If you don't have enough altitude, it won't have time to recover.

        Comment


        • #5
          Watched both of these videos. You tube is a great educational tool for this hobby. No going backwards then in hover mode. Thanks. I'll snap some pics today. Finishing up the model right after my coffee this morning. I'll post up later, fingers crossed, no crashes. lol.

          Comment


          • #6
            Further to the "no hovering backwards" comment...................... When you finally transition to airplane flight and then you transition back to hover mode, before it completes the transition, start to apply forward ELE stick so that it doesn't slow down too fast and bring it to hover gradually. You also notice that you'll need to back off on the throttle because the plane will climb aggressively when the nacelles start to point upwards. Do the transition back to hover mode with lots of altitude as this is the most likely time that the flight controller has a brain fart. If it does, let go of the sticks, don't go too low on the throttle and let it recover on its own before you try to fly it again.

            Comment


            • #7
              Wow what an experience today was. There was no wind at all today at our flying field. The V22 Osprey lifted off for its first half maiden flight. I wasn't comfortable at all. It started drifting pretty good. Got it turned around and I hovered it in circles. I didn't want to transition it into flight mode. I was the only one at the field. I'm happy with my day.

              Comment


              • #8
                Is that a little EDF in the tail? Guessing they need that because the main rotors are not large enough to support the entire aircraft.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yes your correct. I'm not exactly sure how many mm it is. But it sure is loud. The whole aircraft is loud. On Sunday there'll be more experienced pilots their to help me fine tune it, via mechanically or trimming it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    At tail section .

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Skyboom View Post
                      Yes your correct. I'm not exactly sure how many mm it is. But it sure is loud. The whole aircraft is loud. On Sunday there'll be more experienced pilots their to help me fine tune it, via mechanically or trimming it.
                      This is a whole different kind of plane. Don't bother to fine tune it or trim it in hover mode. Even "experienced" pilots (unless experienced with this particular plane) will not have a clue about how it works. You must fly it the whole time. If you try to trim it for hands off hover, it will only end in frustration and make the flight controller more susceptible to a brain fart. The onboard stabilizer has a mind of its own. You can trim it in airplane flight mode and after you land it, you can manually adjust the rods so as to mimic the control surface positions when the trims are back to neutral. OR, don't bother with that either and again, just "fly" it the whole time. This plane's flight controller is a re-programmed version of the one in the Eflite Convergence, but with much less software. If you don't manually adjust the trims immediately after the flight and BEFORE you power it off, it will forget the trims in the next flight as if you didn't trim it at all. I do the manual rod adjustment once and that's it. I "fly" it the whole time from then on and concede that it will never fly "hands off".
                      I love the plane and I think I'll get the coast guard theme like yours if Banana has another sale on it at Xmas just like they did last year. It was selling for $250.00 last Xmas.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Good advice. I'm glad your here xviper. I'd sure hate to mess this model up. What do you figure minimum altitude before transversal? Set my low voltage warning to 3.6 volts but couldn't hear it. I landed after maybe 2 minutes. I checked the battery and all 3 cells were at 3.8 volts. This was hovering mode only. I wouldn't have heard it anway. Maybe I could install some sort of telemetry device. Just to keep an eye on voltage level.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I know from several controller brain farts, that it takes a minimum of 50 feet for it to recover. You'll know it's happening when it flips upside down beyond your control. Suddenly, you just say to yourself, "WTF"? At that point, nothing you do on the TX will help. Just make sure it's got sufficient throttle and then let go of all the sticks and let the FC wake up. It'll flip back over and drift forward in a hover. Apply more forward ELE stick to straighten out. Keep it moving forward and adjust throttle to bring it lower. Steer with AIL and RUD. Land with a bit of forward motion. You might want to really glue in the landing gear and the tires to the rims. A bump landing is tough on the gear/tires.
                          Hovering uses a considerable amount of battery. If all you're doing is hovering, 2 minutes is a safe setting. Once you get used to hovering and landing, then go to airplane mode. Once in airplane mode, it uses much less throttle to stay up. My timer is set at 4 minutes for the total flight. That gives me about a minute to hover in a circuit and land. I run voltage telemetry on mine and while hovering, even right after taking off, the voltage goes below what we consider "safe", but that's under load so don't worry about it. In airplane flight, the voltage is just above "safe", but again, don't worry about it. Once you back off the throttle for moderate flight, the voltage recovers. It's that voltage that I take note of. When it gets to about 3.6v/cell, I start my landing sequence, go into the hover and land. Checking the battery right after shut down, the voltage is around 3.7 - 3.8v. I used a 3000mah, 4s Graphene.
                          I take off in high rates on the ELE as this is the one that is used most aggressively to prevent going backwards and to fight any head wind. Mid rates for the other 2 unless you want lots of RUD authority, which at times, is helpful to steer it in hover. What you use for airplane flight is up to your comfort level.
                          The new Lemon RX with telemetry is what I use but the voltage lead has to be modified so it will plug into one of the balance plug holes. It also can give you altitude but I'm too busy flying to roll the wheel to look at it. I keep the display on voltage.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Wow another beautiful post. I got my note pad out. Thanks for sharing. I'll be making some phone calls about the telemetry receiver. I don't want this to cost me a fortune either. I'll use the old school timer I have for now. Figure I'll take off and hover up to 100 feet. Then fly a couple laps at half throttle. Then switch back to hover mode and land. Try to do it all in 3 minutes. Wish me luck on Sunday, I'll keep you posted, maybe make a video to share.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X