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Answer to some basic questions on 3D printing

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  • #21
    What materials do they use for 3d print? I use them for different varieties of plastic, mainly ABS and PLA. ABS is what LEGOs are made from.
    If you are people also looking for the best printer for homeschool so you can also check out the deatils.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by becky fischer View Post
      What materials do they use for 3d print? I use them for different varieties of plastic, mainly ABS and PLA. ABS is what LEGOs are made from.
      If you are people also looking for the best printer for homeschool so you can also check out the deatils.
      BF, Welcome to Hobby Squawk. Your Comment is well made. As one of the moderators here, I am concerned that you are bordering on spam by including a hyper link to paper printers and not actual 3DP printers. Please refrain from this in future posts. Respectfully, Elbee
      Captain: Got any ideas?
      F/O: Actually not.
      — Captain Chesley B 'Sully' Sullenberger III and F/O Jeff Skiles—

      You'll never be good at something unless you're willing to suck at it first.
      ~Anonymous~

      AMA#116446

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      • #23
        Originally posted by CharlieRodriguez

        3D CAD (3-dimensional computer-aided design) is a technology that engineers, product developers and designers use to create functional, virtual prototypes of three-dimensional objects. With 3D CAD, designers can dynamically create and modify every detail of a product, part or assembly. I use ABS 3D printer for me.
        CR, I am deleting your post. You have included a hyperlink to "https://43dprint.org/abs-3d-printer/" which is outside our advertising policy. If you would like to have a free header banner ad here at Hobby Squawk, contact Aros and see if you are qualified to do so. In the future any further embedded links by you will be treated as Spam and your account closed. Respectfully, LB
        Captain: Got any ideas?
        F/O: Actually not.
        — Captain Chesley B 'Sully' Sullenberger III and F/O Jeff Skiles—

        You'll never be good at something unless you're willing to suck at it first.
        ~Anonymous~

        AMA#116446

        Comment


        • #24
          Originally posted by Elbee View Post

          CR, I am deleting your post. You have included a hyperlink to "https://43dprint.org/abs-3d-printer/" which is outside our advertising policy. If you would like to have a free header banner ad here at Hobby Squawk, contact Aros and see if you are qualified to do so. In the future any further embedded links by you will be treated as Spam and your account closed. Respectfully, LB
          LB, any opinions on 3d printers you'd care to share with me? I'm thinking about jumping off the ledge and getting one. I think The Mud Duck is getting tired of me asking him to make parts for me... 🤣

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          • #25
            Originally posted by jasmith41 View Post

            LB, any opinions on 3d printers you'd care to share with me? I'm thinking about jumping off the ledge and getting one. I think The Mud Duck is getting tired of me asking him to make parts for me... 🤣
            JS, i have one recommendation, Pruse i3 Mk3S+. I have no other reference as this is the only printer I have owned.

            That said, I did do a great deal of research before I bought mine, though that was 3+ years ago now.

            I recommend this printer if the price point fits your budget and I would buy it in the 'kit' version as I did.

            https://www.prusa3d.com/product/orig...i3-mk3s-kit-3/

            It is a simple build of about 8-10 hours if you go by the book (included) and the videos while you're building it. I built mine over 2 days and was printing after running the calibrations a couple of times.

            I have had 'zero' issues with this printer other than those that were self-inflicted.

            The support is second to none, the updates to both the printer firmware and the Prusa Slicer software are constant. These are not 'bug' fixes as genuine improvements in the software dedicated to performance and features. Sounds like a commercial, but it is actually the truth.

            I was not familiar with anything when I started, I just jumped into the deep end. The CAD was/is the caveat for me. I have had no training, but I am persistent and have some patience, I am more comfortable with it all at any rate.

            No matter which printer or what route you choose, I will be more than happy to assist with anything I am able.

            If you have any questions about any printer, let me know, I am here to help.

            Best, Steve (LB)


            Captain: Got any ideas?
            F/O: Actually not.
            — Captain Chesley B 'Sully' Sullenberger III and F/O Jeff Skiles—

            You'll never be good at something unless you're willing to suck at it first.
            ~Anonymous~

            AMA#116446

            Comment


            • #26
              Originally posted by Elbee View Post



              Thank you. I'll pursue it. I have a CAD guy on staff so that element of it may be a non-issue...

              Comment


              • #27
                Originally posted by Elbee View Post

                JS, i have one recommendation, Pruse i3 Mk3S+. I have no other reference as this is the only printer I have owned.

                That said, I did do a great deal of research before I bought mine, though that was 3+ years ago now.

                I recommend this printer if the price point fits your budget and I would buy it in the 'kit' version as I did.

                https://www.prusa3d.com/product/orig...i3-mk3s-kit-3/

                It is a simple build of about 8-10 hours if you go by the book (included) and the videos while you're building it. I built mine over 2 days and was printing after running the calibrations a couple of times.

                I have had 'zero' issues with this printer other than those that were self-inflicted.

                The support is second to none, the updates to both the printer firmware and the Prusa Slicer software are constant. These are not 'bug' fixes as genuine improvements in the software dedicated to performance and features. Sounds like a commercial, but it is actually the truth.

                I was not familiar with anything when I started, I just jumped into the deep end. The CAD was/is the caveat for me. I have had no training, but I am persistent and have some patience, I am more comfortable with it all at any rate.

                No matter which printer or what route you choose, I will be more than happy to assist with anything I am able.

                If you have any questions about any printer, let me know, I am here to help.

                Best, Steve (LB)

                I second this info. I may also add the Prusa Mini+ to the list of FDM 3D printers if you do not require a larger print bed size than 7x7x7in and will not be printing any high temp. materials (for the Mini+ I'd recommend just getting the Semi-Assembled one since it is only $50 more expensive than the Mini+ kit and the lead times for delivery are currently significantly less on the Semi-Assembled version).

                I don’t consider myself a “fanboy” of any particular brand of something. I simply use items, figure out what works well or not, analyze the Pros and Cons, figure out what my needs are right now and the future (within reason), etc. For 3D printers, at the time of this writing, I prefer the Prusa brand of printers. If it changes in the future, I have no issue switching.
                https://www.instagram.com/tcat.rc.creations/
                https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-2CFSVF3mGmuAhs4-hNpAg

                ​​​​​​https://cults3d.com/en/users/TcatRcCreations/creations

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by T-CAT View Post

                  I second this info.
                  I agree. I have a Lulzbot TAZ6 and a Luzlbot Mini. I use them a lot, and I like them. But probably they are pricey for what you get. Also, you are always better off getting the most common machine, and these days that means probably Prusa or Creality for hobby use. There are also a bunch of small businesses that do prototyping as a service, and printers like Ultimaker or Makerbot targeting these kind of professional printing businesses are super nice, super reliable, but $$$$ for a hobbyist. But if you are rich, that is a good option too.

                  I also have a Formlabs Form3, which is super nice, but resin is a whole different animal. You have to first about what you intend to do with it. If you want to make detailed scale doo-dads, then resin is the way to go. If you want larger structural (and lightweight) parts, then probably FDM.

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                  • #29
                    Hi! I have a problem with 3d printing. While printing, cosmovent ABS plastic breaks during printing as well as the thread coming out of the extruder. The only solution that helped was to reduce the print speed by 20-30mm sec, but it will take a very long time to print at this speed. I tried to dry the plastic, changing the temperature, but it didn’t help. I have a Qidi tech 3d printer if it can help.

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                    • #30
                      B4, Firstly, welcome to Hobby Squawk. Secondly, do you need to print these parts in ABS? Why not PLA or PETG? I have no experience with your Qidi Tech 3D Printer; however, I would guess that there is a Support page on their website where you could find tips on printing with ABS. Finally, a successful print is a successful print regardless of the amount of time is required. If it takes longer to print your part in ABS, so be it. I do not know your 'geo' but printing with ABS usually requires an enclosure and a warm environment. You comment about the filament breaking sounds as though you should use a warmer room or an enclosure to print. Hope this helps. I have not had any issues printing with ABS but have found other filaments (PLA and PETG) work for the majority of my RC airplane part designs. Best, LB
                      Captain: Got any ideas?
                      F/O: Actually not.
                      — Captain Chesley B 'Sully' Sullenberger III and F/O Jeff Skiles—

                      You'll never be good at something unless you're willing to suck at it first.
                      ~Anonymous~

                      AMA#116446

                      Comment

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