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Boeing 737 max

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  • Boeing 737 max

    Boeing 737 max may have problems or do pilots? In any case was wondering if pilots lose elevator control, can they use ailerons as elevons to prevent crashing. Or in any big airliner for this matter.

  • #2
    Elevator is usually hydraulic powered, it will have 2 backup systems minimum and trim will also function to control pitch and is on a separate systems. The problem is the CG envelope is rather broad, and the elevator has to have authority through a broad range of air speeds as well. Elevons would not create the tail down force needed to control pitch, but they could allow the craft to descend or climb, if it were trimmed at some specific attitude. It would also depend on whether the controls are ‘fly by wire’ or not, and in which case system failures may be handled through a computer which can include mixing of control surfaces but not to the extent you mentioned- It gets complicated and to my knowledge such systems are not used in Transport Category aircraft. Notice the tail surfaces on most are fully rotating stabilizers. As speeds increase toward transonic the center of lift moves aft and the tail must have more down force to prevent what is called Mach tuck (nose down pitch moment at high speed)
    So, to answer your question - not that I know of, but I don’t know everything.

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    • #3
      I read something that says there's a way to not follow the checklist and confuse the aircraft computer into thinking it needs to run elevator trim full down.
      FF gliders and rubber power since 1966, CL 1970-1990, RC since 1975.

      current planes from 1/2 oz to 22 lbs

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      • #4
        Not following checklists is a common problem, and it usually because the operator is trying to shortcut.
        we actually can call our test pilots to find out why any given item on a list appears in what order...and what may happen if you do it differently.
        It never cease to amaze me when a new owner says.”that checklist is sooo long...”
        My response is “what procedure will you tell them you used at the hearing?”

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        • #5
          Now that the whole fleet is grounded, It sounds like some of the problems are concerning its flight control board. I was reading where pilots are allowed to disengage this in emergency situations. I hope the investigators sort this matter out. I fly only once a year. It's nice having a piece of mind knowing your safe.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Skyboom View Post
            Now that the whole fleet is grounded, It sounds like some of the problems are concerning its flight control board. I was reading where pilots are allowed to disengage this in emergency situations. I hope the investigators sort this matter out. I fly only once a year. It's nice having a piece of mind knowing your safe.
            I think planes have gotten just too complicated. It's probably a software problem or the pilots watching this video too much:
             

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            • #7
              I'd still feel safer flying in a 737 Max, than I would driving to the airport.

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              • #8
                Appears directly related to the MCAS system which combats excessive AOA by forcing a nose down attitude. Problem in both crashes appears the system had faulty sensors thinking the planes were in excessive AOA. Combined with pilot error in trying to correct the issue/lack of training or what-not, ended in tragedy and nearly 400 lost lives.

                NEVER EVER EVER should automation overrule the pilot. EVER! These systems are supposed to make flying more safe and intuitive while lessening the task load and burden level of pilots but they should ALWAYS be able to be shut off if the pilot needs to override the system for any reason.
                Aros.MotionRC
                Motion RC Website/Advertising
                Self-Admitted Warbirdaholic

                My RC videos on YouTube:
                https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDZ..._bdGEJBmtV7YUw

                “My soul is in the sky.”

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Aros.MotionRC View Post
                  Appears directly related to the MCAS system which combats excessive AOA by forcing a nose down attitude. Problem in both crashes appears the system had faulty sensors thinking the planes were in excessive AOA. Combined with pilot error in trying to correct the issue/lack of training or what-not, ended in tragedy and nearly 400 lost lives.

                  NEVER EVER EVER should automation overrule the pilot. EVER! These systems are supposed to make flying more safe and intuitive while lessening the task load and burden level of pilots but they should ALWAYS be able to be shut off if the pilot needs to override the system for any reason.
                  From some of the cockpit pictures I've seen, any more to be a commercial airline pilot you have to have a dual degree in aeronautics and computer science.

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                  • #10
                    I know, right? It's crazy. There's something to be said for good ol' fashioned stick and rudder/analog flying.
                    Aros.MotionRC
                    Motion RC Website/Advertising
                    Self-Admitted Warbirdaholic

                    My RC videos on YouTube:
                    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDZ..._bdGEJBmtV7YUw

                    “My soul is in the sky.”

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                    • #11
                      From what I was reading the pilots in the second crash had originally shut off the autopilot when the trouble started then for whatever reason turned it back on to help them control the plane. That was their undoing unfortunately.

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